Gavin Newsom Flips his Flip-Flop, Supports HSR Again

Oct 20th, 2016 | Posted by

Seven years ago, during his first run for governor, Gavin Newsom told me he strongly supports high speed rail. He backed Proposition 1A in 2008 and said at the time that he supported continued funding.

Two and a half years ago, shortly into his second run for governor, Gavin Newsom changed his position and said the HSR funding should go to other projects.

Today, Gavin Newsom returned to his original view. In a talk at the Sacramento Press Club, Newsom said he supports public funding for HSR:

If elected governor, Gavin Newsom would commit himself to finding public funding for high-speed rail in order to see the imperiled project to completion, the gubernatorial candidate said Wednesday.

But the 49-year-old lieutenant governor also acknowledged that he was concerned about overall funding for the bullet train, and he stopped short of saying where exactly additional public dollars could come from.

“I want to make this work,” Newsom told an audience of about 75 at a Sacramento Press Club luncheon on Wednesday. “I don’t want to see it derailed.”

This is good news and a welcome return to the forward-thinking, infrastructure-minded guy I saw running for governor in 2009. Newsom’s shift to a more conservative mindset in 2014 was really annoying and caused many to question his commitment to green energy and mass transportation solutions. Now that the 2018 governor’s race is about to heat up, Newsom is rightly tacking back to his earlier view and backing HSR.

But he’s still wobbly and in some cases wrong on some key details. Juliet Williams of AP was also there and wrote about Newsom’s remarks:

“I want to be honest about the concerns, and transparent about how this project’s changed, and be honest about the fact that it’s unlikely to generate a big surplus,” Newsom said. “There’s only one rail system in the world that actually generates a profit. I’m not opposed to the vision.”

Um, no, Gavin. Pretty much every HSR system in the world generates a profit. Not all of them cover their construction costs, but there shouldn’t be an expectation that they do.

He went on:

On Wednesday, Newsom noted that when voters approved the project, about a third of the funding was to come from the state bonds, about a third from the federal government and about a third from private financing.

Newsom is aware that in 2010 Republicans seized control of the U.S. House and closed off any new federal HSR funding as long as they held the majority, right? If he’s blaming the governor or the legislature or the CHSRA for this situation, he’s just flat wrong.

“I want to give the governor the benefit of the doubt,” on leveraging more money from that program, Newsom said Wednesday. “If he is successful to invite and secure the private-sector money, that’s a game-changer. And if we can do that, then this thing starts to pencil out. Without that, then I remain concerned about financing.”

This is circular logic. Private sector money only shows up when there’s a more certain public sector funding stream. Cap-and-trade can provide that. So Gavin, where are you on that?

Still, this is a better place for him to be than he was in 2014. And it’s my hope that all the Democratic candidates for governor (and maybe the Republican, if Ashley Swearengin runs, even though Republicans have no hope of being elected governor) strongly support HSR funding in the 2018 election, so that it’s not a campaign issue and instead becomes a de facto position that our state’s next governor is sure to uphold.

  1. Jerry
    Oct 20th, 2016 at 10:40
    #1

    We do need more leaders for HSR.

    les Reply:

    We need leaders who know how to go about funding projects and not those who expect Christmas multiple times a year. This guy seems like a flake if you ask me, one who goes with the ebb and flows and not one can create some himself.

  2. J. Wong
    Oct 20th, 2016 at 12:24
    #2

    Called it.

    This is to all those here (@morris brown, @synonymouse) who posted in essence, “Just wait until Brown is out of office and Newsom cancels HSR” to which my reply was that Newsom was likely to flip-flop on his opposition.

    Admittedly, I have a closer exposure to Newsom since I am a San Francisco resident and I have seen him operate as supervisor and mayor. Still, it wasn’t that hard to predict when you are not invested in stopping HSR.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Good point. I got caught up in the optimism.

    Will the AI dictators that worthies like Musk and Hawking fret about so much prove as corrupt and stupid as their human predecessors?

    Wells Reply:

    A swarthy tech sector guy gets into a public robocar and says “Take me to the burger drive-thru on Cosmopolitan Boulevard.” The robocar answers “No. Every time you’re taken there, you toss the greasy wrapping and unfinished! soda cups in the back seat; a violation of agreement terms. Ejection sequence initiated! You have 10 seconds to get out before you experience a major unpleasantness that will spoil your present existence.”

    Aarond Reply:

    Food for thought: if such technology existed, the state would tax the trip to the mcdonalds (either the electricity to get there, or a VMT charge).

    Car(e)-Free LA Reply:

    One great thing about self driving cars is that I think they’ll spell the end of drive throughs. It’s less convenient with no car ownership, requires programming for each restaurant, and could potentially make the inside of cars dirty.

    Jerry Reply:

    Gavin Newsom was for it,
    before he was against it.
    Now he’s for it, after he was against it, but after he was for it.
    But what will Tom Steyer and Antonio Villaraigosa both say about that??

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    Who knows.

    And who knows whether any of them will run.

    But it appears that Newsom’s flipflop was a calculated move on his path to the governorship, because he knows the votes he wants to get are more likely to be from pro-HSR people than from anti-HSR people. I mean, most anti-HSR people will likely hate his breathing guts for his stance on guns, Latin@s and gays, so as a political move, it was not stupid.

    But is he sincere? Was he sincere before?

    Time will tell.

    Car(e)-Free LA Reply:

    My problem with Newsom is that he is never sincere. His primary goal is to attain the highest level of office that he possibly can.

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    You may not be wrong on that one…

    John Nachtigall Reply:

    just curious. Why do you think he will not flip-flop again. Say, when the construction goes over budget and the total cost of the system rises. Or when the private money is slow in coming.

    Say what you will about brown, but he is a true believer with grit. Newsom will sell it out as soon as he can

    Joe Reply:

    The alternatives are less tractable. Newsom is comitted to doubling infrastructure and lower carbon emissions.

    Newsom wants to govern. You’re thinking about the position of “Chief troll”. That’s the GOP, do nothing and offer nothing. Then they criticize and tweak.

    Aarond Reply:

    Certainly he wants to Govern, but HSR and pollution are not priorities for him as a result. He’d run California like he ran SF: indifferent to anything other than maintaining the status quo. Villaraigosa is the exact opposite, he was instrumental in getting Measure R passed which has doubled LA’s transit network and will integrate it all into one hub (a problem SF still has, as it lacks a hub across it’s three transit networks).

    Joe Reply:

    I’m not a Gavin supporter.

    I still see he’s focused on renewables and clean energy.
    http://www.gavinnewsom.com/issues/energy/index.html

    As for differences in transit …
    LA is a big LA County bigger so transit differs from SF which is smaller and one of 5 counties.

    Gavin took a chance with gay marriage and we’re all better off.
    He’s now on the Pot bandwagon.

    Danny Reply:

    bandwagon is the right word–when the polls tip past 51% on an issue these pols say they’ve always been in the vanguard of a movement they spurned for years; wave them a big check and suddenly they drop the issue

    John Nachtigall Reply:

    I’m pretty sure it was a GOP Govenor who got your precious HSR train rolling.

    But you go ahead and finish every post with “GOP sucks” It does not make you look irrational at all

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    Well Arnie is an-Austrian born Hollywood star…

    So he’s both a coastal elite and European born and he’s a Hollywood elite to boot. I am still wondering how he ever got a GOP registration in the first place. Arnie also believes climate change is real and more efficient cars are better.

    He’s still a doofus, but he’s not your typical GOP doofus.

    Car(e)-Free LA Reply:

    He is pretty much just about fiscal restraint.

    joe Reply:

    I’m pretty sure your hero rejects your values. He disagrees with the current party platform and divisive behavior against Democrats including Obama and Brown.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMbx9tW1b7I

    But he wears your T-Shirt.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    He can’t be a Republican. He speaks in whole sentences that get strung together into coherent thoughts. In a language he learned as adult.

    Aarond Reply:

    notice how this also describes Trump

    joe Reply:

    We’re older so I know you understand how to diagram a sentence.

    Have at it:

    Look, having nuclear—my uncle was a great professor and scientist and engineer, Dr. John Trump at MIT; good genes, very good genes, OK, very smart, the Wharton School of Finance, very good, very smart—you know, if you’re a conservative Republican, if I were a liberal, if, like, OK, if I ran as a liberal Democrat, they would say I’m one of the smartest people anywhere in the world—it’s true!—but when you’re a conservative Republican they try—oh, do they do a number—that’s why I always start off: Went to Wharton, was a good student, went there, went there, did this, built a fortune—you know I have to give my like credentials all the time, because we’re a little disadvantaged—but you look at the nuclear deal, the thing that really bothers me—it would have been so easy, and it’s not as important as these lives are (nuclear is powerful; my uncle explained that to me many, many years ago, the power and that was 35 years ago; he would explain the power of what’s going to happen and he was right—who would have thought?), but when you look at what’s going on with the four prisoners—now it used to be three, now it’s four—but when it was three and even now, I would have said it’s all in the messenger; fellas, and it is fellas because, you know, they don’t, they haven’t figured that the women are smarter right now than the men, so, you know, it’s gonna take them about another 150 years—but the Persians are great negotiators, the Iranians are great negotiators, so, and they, they just killed, they just killed us.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Word Salad has a much more flexible syntax and grammar.

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    One day this sentence will be up there with the great speeches.

    And children will have to learn it by heart in middle school…

    Aarond Reply:

    I was attempting to make a joke, see the phrase “In a language he learned as adult.”

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    Humor is dead on the web…

    Wells Reply:

    Now I have a brain drain headache. Thanks a lot.
    Drinking game for Donald – he whose name shall not be uttered:
    When his last name is spoken, DRINK.
    When he is speaking and the barrage of yelling at the TV monitor quells
    to silence and he’s still speaking, shout “3-second rule, 3-2-1” then DRINK.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    The Donald is definitely a Republican. The RNC keeps saying so. Own it.
    If we assume what comes out of his mouth is an attempt at English, what other languages does The Donald speak? Which one did his immigrant mother teach him?

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    Bigly?

    Car(e)-Free LA Reply:

    Locker-room-talkeese

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    Maybe, just maybe, we need less regulation about whether or not lockers in locker rooms should be affixed to the ground enough to not fall over?

    No. Regulations are there for a reason.

    J. Wong Reply:

    Actually, if elected, I expect Newsom would be motivated to figure out how to make HSR work both for keeping costs contained and funding it. He wouldn’t flip-flop again and cancel the project (which is the easy way out).

  3. synonymouse
    Oct 20th, 2016 at 12:49
    #3

    Meantime luv them SMART doodlebugs:

    “Cummins Inc., the engine manufacturer, will rebuild SMART’s engines in Indiana before swapping them out in Sonoma County. SMART staff said the work will occur over weekends, beginning in November and lasting through April.”

    Jerry Reply:

    doodlebugs? Or Toonerville Trolley?

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    What’s a doodlebug?

    Reality Check Reply:

    Doodlebug (rail car)

    In the United States, doodlebug was the common name for a self-propelled railcar. While such a coach typically had a gasoline-powered engine that turned a generator which provided electricity to traction motors, which turned the axles and wheels on the trucks, versions with mechanical transmissions also existed.

    Doodlebugs sometimes pulled an unpowered trailer car, but were more often used singularly. They were popular with some railroads during the first part of the 20th century to provide passenger and mail service on lightly used branch lines, obviating the need to operate conventional trains consisting of a locomotive and coaches. Several railroads, mostly small regional and local networks, provided their main passenger services through doodlebugs in a cost cutting effort.

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    Thanks.

  4. Jerry
    Oct 20th, 2016 at 14:26
    #4

    OT “Angeli” was lowered today by Los Angeles Metro. The 400 foot long boring machine had it’s head lowered today on the start of the downtown Regional Connector.

    http://la.streetsblog.org/2016/10/19/metro-lowers-angeli-the-regional-connector-tunnel-boring-machine/

    Morales joked that when LA was done with the machine then HSR could use it.

    Roland Reply:

    Morales is apparently not aware that the cretins on his RDP team are demanding 28-foot 200 MPH tunnels through large cities: http://default.sfplanning.org/Citywide/railyard_blvd/2016-09-18_CWG_Mtg2_Handouts-final.pdf (slide 10).

    Roland Reply:

    There is something seriously wrong with these 200 MPH DTX twin bores because they can’t possibly fit under 2nd (or 7th) which only have 85 feet between building lines…

    Looking at HS2 (http://tunneltalk.com/UK-high-speed-rail-28Oct2014-HS2-procurement-and-TBM-drive-strategy.php), it looks like PB copied the tunnels in the boonies which have an internal diameter of 8.55M (28 feet) and a design speed of 200 MPH but the only urban tunnel has an i.d. of 7.55M (24.75 feet) and a design speed of 230 KPH (143 MPH), so this tunnel’s i.d. could easily be reduced by another foot (between 7.15M (same as HS1) and 7.25M) for the DTX (80 MPH approach speed between 22nd & the TTC).

    So the question is whether we are dealing with the usual crass stupidity (50% likely) or if someone is trying to force SF to swallow 4 blocks of C&C under 2nd Street (and a couple more Billions)?

    EJ Reply:

    Good lord. If you’re boring them out that large, you might as well go a few feet wider and make one double-track tunnel.

  5. Jerry
    Oct 20th, 2016 at 14:33
    #5

    Also OT
    CAHSR launched a new Interactive Map containing information about alignments, project sections, and stations.
    https://cahsr-tools.pbid.com/maps/corridoralignment/#

    Eric Reply:

    doesn’t appear to work for me

    Roland Reply:

    Try again.

  6. Jerry
    Oct 20th, 2016 at 14:54
    #6

    Again OT. For SF Muni followers;
    Starting Nov. 7, SFMTA will resume operations of the S-Shuttle service between Embarcadero and West Portal stations. The shuttle makes a shorter trip between the heaviest used stations in The City’s subway route.
    http://www.sfexaminer.com/sfmta-bring-back-castro-shuttle-ease-subways-crushing-crowds/
    Could CalTrain use a similar shuttle train service during the rush hour??

    Joey Reply:

    Is there a short segment of the Caltrain corridor that has similarly disproportionate demand? I noticed nothing that stood out that much the last time I looked at their ridership numbers

    Richard Mlynarik Reply:

    No, but the model of “all-stops local shuttle serving closer-spaced closer-to-CBD stops, with express-then-local limited serving outer stops” has wide currency world-wide.

    You can even see that at backwards Muni!
    https://www.sfmta.com/sites/default/files/projects/5L%20Benefits.pdf
    (This is actually working well. Mirabile Dictu!)

    It’s very clear indeed how to do it for Caltrain:
    http://caltrain-hsr.blogspot.com/2013/10/census-driven-service-planning.html

    Nothing new. Just do what works well in places that work well.

    Which means Caltrain is doing the exact opposite: insane mix of different end-to-end limited-stops trains each with different stop patterns during the peaks, for ever, along with utterly shit hour-headway all-stops end-to-end trains off-peak, forever.
    No service planning. No data. No interest in efficiency. No interest in riders. No interest in ridership. No interest in service.
    Just North American Olde Tyme Commuter Railroading, yesterday, today, tomorrow, and forever. For the employees and contractors, by the employees and contractors. Just the way they like it.

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    But couldn’t the employees and contractors make more money if there was higher ridership?

    So shouldn’t optimizing ridership be in everybody’s interest?

    John Nachtigall Reply:

    this is easily explained

    THEY (the CAHSR Authority) ARE INCOMPETENT!!

    they cant plan it, they cant design it, they cant build it, they wont be able to run it.

    How many data points do you need?

    This is just another brick in the wall. These stations will exists for 50+ years. You obviously want to build them at the maximum possible size. You dont have to be any kind of genius to recognize that. But no, they “cheap” out, ensuring that the usability will be minimal

    so now we are going to spend billions on an extra 4 trains an hour with compromised speed and utility because they didnt want to have to get the extra land. As if in 20 years it will be easier to expand the stations and not cost an exponential amount more

    And the cherry on top will be when they are losing money (because they cant run enough trains) and they blame the station design as a limiting factor, a design they choose. it is so obvious, how can everyone not see this?

    John Nachtigall Reply:

    this is easily explained

    THEY (the CAHSR Authority) ARE INCOMPETENT!!

    they cant plan it, they cant design it, they cant build it, they wont be able to run it.

    How many data points do you need?

    This is just another brick in the wall. These stations will exists for 50+ years. You obviously want to build them at the maximum possible size. You dont have to be any kind of genius to recognize that. But no, they “cheap” out, ensuring that the usability will be minimal

    so now we are going to spend billions on an extra 4 trains an hour with compromised speed and utility because they didnt want to have to get the extra land. As if in 20 years it will be easier to expand the stations and not cost an exponential amount more

    And the cherry on top will be when they are losing money (because they cant run enough trains) and they blame the station design as a limiting factor, a design they choose. it is so obvious, how can everyone not see this?

    joe Reply:

    Richard wrote:

    Which means Caltrain is doing the exact opposite:

    John writes:

    this is easily explained

    THEY (the CAHSR Authority) ARE INCOMPETENT!!

    Double post.
    Mistakes Caltrain for CHSR.

    Bahnfreund Reply:

    Dunning Kruger?

    Roland Reply:

    Q: Why extend Caltrain service to Blossom Hill when you can blow $180M relocating Hillsdale?
    A: Because grade-separating 25th Avenue (WTF???) is part of E-L-E-C-T-R-I-F-I-C-A-T-I-O-N.

    joe Reply:

    I missed where Caltrain is paying for grade separating 25th Ave.

    In total, the city will likely spend about $12 million on both planning and construction phases of the project while seeking $84 million from the High-Speed Rail Authority and $65 million from the San Mateo County Transportation Authority. It’s also seeking $10 million from the California Public Utilities Commission — which has rated the 25th Avenue project as one of the top 10 priority grade separations in the state.

    Blossom Hill is responsibility of S-A-N-T-A C-L-A-R-A C-O-U-N-T-Y. The stop is not on the HSR Line nor are you a top ten issue for the PUC.

    Time to upgrade your smartphone & data plan.

    Roland Reply:

    Here is what you missed:
    1) http://www.cityofsanmateo.org/DocumentCenter/Home/View/8493
    2) http://santaclaravta.iqm2.com/Citizens/FileOpen.aspx?Type=4&ID=7304

    Time to upgrade your smartphone & data plan.

    joe Reply:

    Blossom Hill Boyz types:

    A: Because grade-separating 25th Avenue (WTF???) is part of E-L-E-C-T-R-I-F-I-C-A-T-I-O-N.

    First, I don’t see Caltrain paying for this grade separation. show me where I missed it son.

    Second, you make no sense.

    Q: Why extend Caltrain service to Blossom Hill when you can blow $180M relocating Hillsdale?

    There’s service at Blossom Hill.

    Roland Reply:

    Let’s try again:

    1) Kindly help me understand which part of this letter it is that you do not understand: https://goo.gl/GtP6vD

    2) Kindly help me understand which part of this resolution it is that you did not understand: http://santaclaravta.iqm2.com/Citizens/FileOpen.aspx?Type=4&ID=7304

    3) There is “service” to Gilroy too but I had no idea there were 350K residents with a 6-figure average household income within 5 miles of the garlic capital of the World.

    Joe Reply:

    You can’t carry on a normal discussion and now think mocking Gilroy makes you sound smart.

    Still No evidence any Caltrain money pays for the San Mateo grade separation. You were bullshitting no?

    SF to SJ Electrification is happening and high priority — apparently you’re now implying the project shouldn’t be completed until your blossom hill stop is fixed and ROW electrified. Not gonna happen Dude. You’re the tail end and mocking everything south of your stop makes it less likely you’ll see any improvements.

    Roland Reply:

    You apparently have issues reading/comprehending English. Is this a side-effect of a garlic overdose?

    J. Wong Reply:

    Is this what you’re referencing: “[Caltrain] does not have the capacity to finance the project in the foreseeable future”? Because that seems to imply that Caltrain is not providing any funding to the 25th Ave grade separation.

    Joe Reply:

    The Project budget is itemized here.
    http://www.smcta.com/Assets/__Agendas+and+Minutes/TA/Board+of+Directors/Presentations/2016/2016-09-01+TA+25th+Ave+Grade+Sep.pdf

    No Caltrain money.

    Roland Reply:

    So why are they asking VTA approval for Caltrain to go out and issue $150M in passenger revenue bonds then?

    Joe Reply:

    On which slide?

    Joe Reply:

    Just a link without any explanation.

    There’s no mention of grade separating and no mention of the specific project where I did show no Caltrain money is spent.

    I think you’re making a mistake or misleading people. Caltrain is not paying for the 25th ave grade separation.

    Page two lists funding sources.
    http://www.smcta.com/Assets/__Agendas+and+Minutes/TA/Board+of+Directors/Presentations/2016/2016-09-01+TA+25th+Ave+Grade+Sep.pdf

    Roland Reply:

    Let’s try again:

    1) Kindly help me understand which part of this letter it is that you do not understand: https://goo.gl/GtP6vD

    Jerry Reply:

    Following Giant’s games CalTrain runs special capacity trains.
    The first is express to Palo Alto and local stops after that.
    The second is local stops to Palo Alto and then express to San Jose.
    I know from nothing about scheduling, but couldn’t a turnaround/reverse during daily rush hour from a mid-way point help with the capacity (SRO) problem? ?

    Roland Reply:

    How about the MLK special consist with 10 gallery cars lugged by two F40?

    J. Wong Reply:

    See @Clem’s proposal: Census Driven Service Planning.

    Roland Reply:

    Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. Don’t show that to Joece!!!!

  7. Danny
    Oct 21st, 2016 at 10:34
    #7

    Schrödinger’s Candidate

    Jerry Reply:

    :-)
    Never thought of it that way before.
    Can be said about more than just one candidate.

  8. Roland
    Oct 21st, 2016 at 11:57
    #8
  9. morris brown
    Oct 21st, 2016 at 20:15
    #9

    As previously noted by Roland, Dan Richard at the Rail~volution conference says, the Authority does not have as it primary goal, High Speed Rail. Rather Rail Modernization it the Goal of the Authority.

    Richard doesn’t care that the primary funding, Prop 1A bonds have multiple restrictions to make sure that it is HSR that will be built, not other projects.

    Anyway, video link and transcript of Richard’s remarks (about 3 mintues) can be viewed here:

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9m407yyFerManpPTFZfbTJWOVE

    joe Reply:

    But a key Prop1a restriction is no operating subsidy. Another is CA must identify all funds for a segment.

    HSR stretches limited money to provide service and generate revenue.

    Blended SJ to SF saves 10’s of Billions of dollars over a dedicated ROW.

    It’s all 100% consistent with Prop1a objectives.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    What recourse do they have once all the bond money is spent?

    Roland Reply:

    Stupid question from someone who knows absolutely nothing about this: how does one run a service to Gilroy without an operating subsidy?

    StevieB Reply:

    Do you imply that a California High-Speed Rail system that stops in Gilroy can never break even? What is your reasoning?

    Roland Reply:

    As things stand, SJ to SF is the only segment that could possibly be operated without a subsidy, so any system coming from the south that terminates in SJ is pretty much DOA.
    Any system crossing the Bay would be a no-brainer money-printing machine. There maybe other opportunities in SoCal but Paul would be a better person to ask.

    Going back to Gilroy, it may be possible to support this extension once the Peninsula concession is firmly in place (this may take as long as 2-3 years). “Subsidies” would originate from profits in the Peninsula but this may be a tough pill to swallow for the concessionaire.

    StevieB Reply:

    The concession will be to operate the entire system so your talk of the Peninsula concession makes no sense. It is ridiculous to imagine multiple concessions between individual stations.

    Roland Reply:

    So no concession until they are done tunneling across Pacheco and the Tehachapis then? Whatever happened to the Podunkdale concession?

    Tokkyu40 Reply:

    Profits depend on passenger miles. This requires two things. First, passengers, which means going between where people are and where they want to go. There are 50,000 people in the city of Gilroy and a total metro area population of 1.8 million, which is a strong potential passenger base.
    Second is miles. The farther a passenger is carried on a trip the more can be charged per trip. This is why cabbies prefer to carry a passenger 20 miles to the airport rather than 2 miles to the store.
    And the Gilroy extension isn’t just a single section from Gilroy to San Jose. It will be part of a system initially extending up to San Francisco. Increasing the number of destinations by adding Gilroy also increases the utility of the line, which increases the number of people who can use the line and will pay to do so.

    Joe Reply:

    He’s trolling.

    Today Caltrain operates service between SF and SJ with a fare subsidy.
    Tomorrow when HSR starts, Caltrain between SF to SJ will be electric, operate with a fare subsidy and run more frequently with fast acceleration and speeds up to 110 mph. HSR will be a ups lady e alternative at a few (3) select stations.

    HSR’s advantage is when it operates at higher speed and over greater distances than 50 miles.

    Roland Reply:

    Pardon my vernacular but WTF does any of this drivel have to do with operating without a subsidy?

    Roland Reply:

    The “problem” with CPUC section 185032(b) is actually an opportunity!!!
    Please vote early (and often) for Prop 53!!!!

    Zorro Reply:

    I voted NO on 53, Revenue Bonds are not paid for by Taxes, they are paid for by Customers, a person in Fresno as an example would not be paying for some Revenue Bond in another counties water project. As to this effecting HSR, that ain’t happening, the CHSRA isn’t interested in Revenue Bonds, none of the money is Revenue Bond based, not even CnT is Revenue related.

    Zorro Reply:

    So what? Revenue Bonds are not mentioned there once… Not once…

    185032. Upon an appropriation in the Budget Act for that purpose,
    the authority shall prepare a plan for the construction and operation
    of a high-speed train network for the state, consistent with and
    continuing the work of the Intercity High-Speed Rail Commission
    conducted prior to January 1, 1997. The plan shall include an
    appropriate network of conventional intercity passenger rail service
    and shall be coordinated with existing and planned commuter and urban
    rail systems.
    (a) The authorization and responsibility for planning,
    construction, and operation of high-speed passenger train service at
    speeds exceeding 125 miles per hour in this state is exclusively
    granted to the authority.
    (b) Except as provided in paragraph (2), nothing in this
    subdivision precludes other local, regional, or state agencies from
    exercising powers provided by law with regard to planning or
    operating, or both, passenger rail service.

    PUBLIC UTILITIES CODE SECTION 185030-185038

    Roland Reply:

    Whoops! That was supposed to be a new thread: http://www.vta.org/News-and-Media/Connect-with-VTA/New-Santa-Clara-Caltrain-Undercrossing-Breaks-Ground#.WAsOHegrIzE

    Roland Reply:

    @Zorro: “Except as provided in paragraph (2), nothing in this subdivision precludes other local, regional, or state agencies from exercising powers provided by law with regard to planning or operating, or both, passenger rail service” means that PBRRA does not have any exclusive rights below 125 MPH (thank you Senator Kopp!).

    Prop 53 does not say anything about preventing projects from being financed by revenue bonds, only that any project above $2B would require voter approval.

    Alan Reply:

    As usual, Morris is distorting the facts. He implies that Dan Richards’ comments state that the CHSRA is replacing HSR with “rail modernization”. The fact is, HSR is part of that modernization. Richards’ point is that HSR is one piece of the puzzle, but his goal is coordinating HSR construction with modernization of the various connecting systems. That isn’t just a good idea, it is consistent with the spirit of Prop 1A, which expects CHSRA to work together with the various agencies.

    It sure would be nice to see Morris tell the truth once in a while.

    synonymouse Reply:

    The technical dumbing down is a clear indication that PBCAHSR will be a commute run cum TEE not state of the art HSR, as promised to the voters. Prop 1a was fatally flawed and self-contradictory and the Palmdale commute faction is prevailing. Kinda like BART, which was sabotaged by the SP.

  10. Roland
    Oct 22nd, 2016 at 00:04
    #10

    Whoops! That was supposed to be a new thread: http://www.vta.org/News-and-Media/Connect-with-VTA/New-Santa-Clara-Caltrain-Undercrossing-Breaks-Ground

    Roland Reply:

    Third time lucky…

  11. JimInPollockPines
    Oct 23rd, 2016 at 11:01
    #11

    Gavin is not governor of california material.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Kim Kardashian is governor of California material

    nslander Reply:

    That’s just dumb.

  12. Roland
    Oct 24th, 2016 at 10:32
    #12

    New Fresno animations: http://hsr.ca.gov/docs/newsroom/2016_Animations_release_101116.pdf

    Roland Reply:

    Missing video links:
    https://youtu.be/V0stTQqeE5E
    https://youtu.be/AKsjqu3l0xA

    Car(e)-Free LA Reply:

    Very nice.

  13. EJ
    Oct 24th, 2016 at 10:54
    #13

    Um, no, Gavin. Pretty much every HSR system in the world generates a profit. Not all of them cover their construction costs, but there shouldn’t be an expectation that they do.

    If the system doesn’t pay its construction costs, then it’s not generating a profit. An “operating profit,” maybe, but it isn’t profitable.

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