June Election Open Thread

Jun 3rd, 2014 | Posted by

Californians (well, maybe 28% of them) will go to the polls today to pick the top two candidates in contested races that will go to the November election. At least two races involve high speed rail in one form or another:

Governor: If you’ve turned on your TV at all in the last few weeks, you’ve seen the Neel Kashkari ad where he takes an axe to a toy train explaining how he’ll “stop the crazy train.” But his ad blitz and his opposition to HSR hasn’t been enough to ensure he makes it to the November ballot. Even if he does pull out second place, he will get crushed by Jerry Brown this fall.

26th Senate District: State Sen. Ted Lieu is leaving the seat to run for Congress, and there’s a big field of Democrats running to take his place. One of the candidates is Manhattan Beach mayor Amy Howorth, a Democrat who has been controversially spouting Republican anti-HSR talking points. It’s hard to predict who will make the top two here in a wide open field, but I’m hoping for Sandra Fluke and Ben Allen.

Any other election-related thoughts? Share them in the comments.

  1. joe
    Jun 3rd, 2014 at 18:29
    #1

    Kamala Harris narrowly won and thank god she did.
    Popular vote 4,443,070 4,368,617

    The Project needs a dedicated AG behind it.
    Look for her and Gavin Newsom to battle over the Post-Brown California.

    nslander Reply:

    The sight of Gavin Newsom makes me wince. We owe it to the rest of the nation to force that triangulating haircut into the private sector.

    Michael Reply:

    He will be the next Senator from California, whenever the spot opens up, where people will think we actually elected Will Arnett.

    http://arresteddevelopment.wikia.com/wiki/G.O.B.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    Willie Brown’s dying wish: that all statewide offices are held by his protégés.

    Kamala as Governor, check.
    Gavin as Senator, check….

    Ed Lee as Attorney General?

    synonymouse Reply:

    Leland Yee for AG.

    joe Reply:

    I agree.

    Recall cringing at this ? http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/Newsom-s-wife-says-sex-joke-has-been-exaggerated-2686672.php

    Not sure he’ll make US Senate. The cold relationship with Gov. Brown and sitting in the do nothing Lt. Gov position doesn’t help a career.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Gavin has cast his lot with the majority of voters; you all have cast yours with PB, Tutor and the Tejon Ranch Co.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Some liberals you are to have such devotion to three rich, crooked big businesses. Limousine liberals.

    nslander Reply:

    Just stop. You simply can’t ignore the public opinion surveys resulting in Prop1A and two terms to its most prominent political proponent and expect anybody to take you seriously. I just checked the returns with the SOS- Kashkari is at 18%. THAT is the real measure of popular opposition to HSR in CA, and there is NOTHING ELSE IN EVIDENCE. Tag Newsom predictably chose the mindless CA Republican talking point of the cycle as his Rick Perry glasses. Of course, this was after he was for HSR. But we all know he will be FOR it again in four years.

    Emmanuel Reply:

    Yup. Gavin Newsom? No thanks. I rather have someone from the California State Senate. Marty Block or Mark Leno. Whatever we do. We need someone who is liberal and frugal. Who speaks and thinks logically and cuts through the bullshit.

    *sigh* why can’t we just get rid off term limits? I rather have Jerry Brown for a 5th term than to see a new Democrat or Republican ruin everything again. And don’t come me with those crazy independents.

    jimsf Reply:

    I like that Gavin made a move on gay rights as Mayor, but other than that he wasn’t a great Mayor. Willie Brown was a better Mayor as he took the city from post earthquake/post Bush recession into the the first tech revolution and got the city put back together after the earthquake. Granted, he probably had a lot of federal money to work with, and he benefited from the Clinton economy, but but Gavin did was mostly fluff.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Willie Brown was a major villain in BART to SFO killing the electrification of Caltrain and the TBT tunnel.

    Gavin did not do anything about Geary but neither did Willie Brown. Alioto was instrumental in subway-surface and Feinstein likewise in rebuilding the cable car lines.

    Worst in postwar era: Lapham and Robinson. But Rolph and/or Rossi should have tried much harder, in retrospect, to buy the URR-Market St. Ry. well before 1944. The private operators successfully opposed numerous key capital improvement ballot measures which would have radically changed the picture of SF transit for the better. An existent subway on Market, and maybe Mission, would have kept out Bechtel and its broad gauge bastardization.

    Drunk Engineer Reply:

    Kamala Harris narrowly won and thank god she did.

    Yep. Nobody has worked harder to undermine CEQA.

    joe Reply:

    Typical Palo Alto-Menlo Park-Atherton hysterics.

    http://kamalaharris.org/issues/fighting-for-the-environment/

    Mac Reply:

    Quoting your link: “The Attorney General has acted to ensure local decision-makers fully consider alternatives to, and mitigation for, new projects that will impose significant environmental impacts on communities that are already overburdened by pollution”….. add this: when it suits her.

    joe Reply:

    Hilarious – The quote refers to local decision makers which for Bakersfield’s EIR is Mr. Tandy and the City Council.

    The CAHSRA has done a heroic job compiling a large, complete EIR complainant with CEQA sans any constructive input from local officials.

    Mac Reply:

    One problem is that Tandy and Council believe that the HSR project itself imposes significant environmental impacts on CV communities that are already overburdened by pollution—-and that the HSRA isn’t forthcoming with adequate mitigation or alternatives.. The HSR project is no panacea for the CV. The CV does not view the CAHSRA as heroes…
    Apparently Kern Co. feel the same way because today they voted to file a CEQA lawsuit as well. Our AG has her own agenda.

    joe Reply:

    The CEQA process is about CAHSRA mitigating environmental impacts – not appeasing the City Manager or County when they decide to sit out the planning process.

    AG Harris will defend the Legislature approved Project’s EIR and CAHSRA will fix any deficiencies the court identifies.

    Neither Kern nor Bakersfield offered any preferred alternative when Bakersfield changed their preference away from downtown.
    NO is not an option.

    This all ends with a revised EIR that addresses any shortcomings and a HSR alignment in downtown Bakersfield. Just ask Atherton.

    Cute article on how Kern CO wanted a bypass but could NOT drawn a line on a map to show here. Kern wanted with new station location somewhere in Bakersfield but didn’t know where. meanwhile City Manager Tandy complains no one told him about Kern’s offer – I suppose Kern Co doesn’t have to coordinate with the City. It’s all HSR’s fault.

    http://www.bakersfieldcalifornian.com/local/x1210656900/High-speed-rail-agency-rejects-idea-of-bypassing-downtown-Bakersfield

    This is the clown show that will roll into court. I can only hope they allow cameras.

    synonymouse Reply:

    The clown show is the State Legislature. Think they are going to do anything about no-shows of public employees?

    “Don’t bother to protest. It won’t do any good.”

    – Gen. Prayuth

    I wonder how he or our newly “elected” pal Gen Al-Sissi would handle no-shows.

    The most interesting aspect of this year’s election is the apparent absence of the LA water grab measure or the divide the state measure. The initiative concept was gutted when they increased the number of signers to onerously high. Love that good ol’ boy regime.

    Mac Reply:

    Too bad another community has to take CAHSRA to court to fix deficiencies in an EIR. Do you think just possibly there is a problem on their end?

    joe Reply:

    It’s wonderful that anyone can sue to have their complaints heard in court and enumerate all the deficiencies they believe exist. It has to be slam dunk for Bakersfield since Tandy’s been clear the EIR is deficient and terribly written. Fantastic he that can goto court and make an ass of himself.

    Peninsula opponents sued the EIR and the Judge asked for three small fixes to the large EIR. CA HSR A withdrew the EIR and quickly made the three fixes. They resubmitted the EIR and it was approved.

    Alan Reply:

    The city has to prove that it exhausted its administrative remedies before it can even present its alledged “deficiencies” to the court. Tandy sticking his fingers in his ears, closing his eyes and going “Neener, neener, neener” doesn’t count.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    The next one they do they should hire Dagny Taggart to manage it and have her subcontract Howard Roark.

  2. Michael
    Jun 3rd, 2014 at 19:04
    #2

    arresteddevelopment.wikia.com/wiki/G.O.B.

  3. Alon Levy
    Jun 3rd, 2014 at 21:26
    #3

    SF Prop B passed. So much for TOD.

    joe Reply:

    Like AT&T Park and the Warrior’s Stadium which was thank god killed.
    You’d develop Chicago’s Grant Park.

    meanwhile construction cost comparisons
    http://nextcity.org/daily/entry/spain-high-speed-train-toronto-commuter-new-york-elevators

    CA’s cost when converted is estimated to be 45 Euro per KM. Mama Mia!

    Alon Levy Reply:

    You’re trolling with the Grant Park comment. Prop B is about (not) redeveloping built-up areas, not parks.

    joe Reply:

    No. The SF water front is a public space – regulated development (height) blocks the water front from view. That’s one reason why residents voted for Prop B. Now the voters can approve projects that exceed regulations.

    Chicago protected the lake front on the S but not the N side. You can’t see the lake on the N side due to the fantastically unaffordable multi story buildings.

    Joey Reply:

    I think Alon Levy is right here – this is about projects like 8 Washington where fearmongers and people living in adjacent buildings want to limit or stop development.

    Joe Reply:

    Voter approval is needed. A few cranks next door to a project are not going have any control. The city set limits in 1990 after s long public planning process.

    I’m surprised neither of you has mentioned the Golden State Warriors stadium project on the water front. Glad to see you guys both endorse it because that’s exactly what opposing prop B allows.

    If developers want to exemption’s they should go to the voters, rather than to politically connected people and cut deals to sell out the city.

    Joey Reply:

    I don’t see any reason to be opposed to the Warriors arena on principal – it’s not a particularly transit-accessible location and the city seemed too willing to pour money into it, but I don’t think it would be problematic otherwise – what it would have been built on currently amounts to a patch of concrete over the water.

    Michael Reply:

    Warriors are paying for their arena, just like the Giants funded the overwhelming majority of the ballpark. Pier 30-32 will be an unstable pier used as a parking lot until it deteriorates to the point it won’t even be good for parking and just sits there, fenced off.

    Joe Reply:

    They can build it but not at the water front as a prominant feature if SF as they wish.

    They moved it because it was an unpopular.

    Michael Reply:

    They moved it because the Army Corps of Engineers, who have jurisdiction over projects affecting the waters of the US, exerted its right to review, which would have been a three to five year process. Final straw, camel’s back, all that. But they want an arena now, so they defaulted to second choice.

    http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/Warriors-Piers-30-32-arena-plan-faced-long-5422370.php

    Jon Reply:

    The SF waterfront is a sea of parking lots and the sooner it’s redeveloped into commercial buildings, residential buildings, and actual parks, the better.

    All the passing of prop B shows is that SF “progressive” votes can still be conned into helping NIMBY 1%ers protect their multi-million dollar views of the bay. At least it was closer than I thought it would be.

    Joe Reply:

    Prop B doesn’t stop development. It does not empower local NIMBYs.
    That’s why it passed.

    Michael Reply:

    How does putting every project up to a vote not empower NIMBYs?

    Joe Reply:

    If NIMBY refers to a city wide vote then it’s a misuse of the word.

    Not In My Back Yard.
    Back Yard refers to very local interests which are inferred to be different than the larger community.

    Even in PAMPA NIMBYs were overwhelmed by peninsula residents who wanted electrified, blended service.

    J. Wong Reply:

    @Joe

    The boundary between localities is going to be malleable in this case. NIMBY here would apply to San Francisco in general, not just in a local neighborhood.

    That said, it does empower NIMBYs in your limited definition of the word because theirs has now become the default position (i.e., don’t build it) whereas before they had to mobilize to get issues on the ballot to prevent development. Now the developers must run a city-wide campaign if they wish to exceed any height limits on the waterfront.

    joe Reply:

    “The boundary between localities is going to be malleable in this case. NIMBY here would apply to San Francisco in general, not just in a local neighborhood.”

    Since no one can willy nilly develop land without permits and zoning compliance, the default has always been no development until approved – NIMBY by default.

    Here NIMBY is meaningless as it applies to the City controlling development. Also Prop B doesn’t stop development – it limits how height waivers are issued.

    This stops politically connected developers from getting waivers for being connected.

    Joe, formerly of Noe Valley, thinks the City must revisit the 1990 plan for the area and update it so as to not need waivers.

    A good plan for the water front will get approval from residents. It’s going to skew development in favor of projects that provide public benefit. The W’s stadium, 41 games a year and only if you buy a ticket, is an awful us elf the water front.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    Uh right. MUNI is on strike and you don’t seem to get Prop B raised the specter of more über wealthy moving into the City and making life hell for those that live there already and vote. Plus, housing alone won’t solve this problem.

    Jon Reply:

    a) What does Muni being on strike have to do with prop B?
    b) Do you really think the uber wealthy will stop moving to SF because of prop B? All it will mean is increased competition for the existing housing stock.
    c) If more housing won’t solve the problem, what will? It’s not the only part of the solution, but it’s the biggest part.

    joe Reply:

    c) If more housing won’t solve the problem, what will? It’s not the only part of the solution, but it’s the biggest part.

    SF is a unique, international city. You can’t build enough housing in SF to reduce rents to say 1990 prices. There’s not enough SF.

    Wealthy residents attract businesses and services for the wealthy which further attracts more wealthy people. Neighbourhoods change and places like hardware stores disappear. It becomes too expensive and difficult to live in the area without having money.

    Whole Foods displaces the neighbourhood grocery store and groceries jump. Cheap eateries are up-scaled.

    What might work is criminal violence.

    Early 1990’s Dolores Park at Chruch and 20th had a large open drug scene and the pimps and dealers openly threatening residents if they interferred or call the cops. Now Facebook’s Zuckerman wants to (or has) bought a residence there.

    Jon Reply:

    There’s not enough SF

    There’s a whole eastern side of the city that is nothing but abandoned buildings, empty warehouses, and junk yards. There are light industrial buildings a stone’s throw from the financial district that could be used for office space rather than auto shops, drive-thrus and gas stations. There are parking lots near the waterfront, right next to existing skyscrapers, that could host high-density residential without being remotely out of character with the city skyline. There’s a mess of unnecessary freeways and flyover ramps that could be pruned back to free up more space for development. We are nowhere near the capacity limit of the city, and we can keep growing without demolishing a single victorian house or ruining any historic neighborhoods.

    San Francisco suffers from the malign effect of older residents, and former residents, who want to preserve the city in amber forever, for reasons of “truthiness” that don’t bear any relation to actual cause and effect. It is killing the city.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    Private housing is nobody’s public space. Should the city wish to make it public space, it’s welcome to seize it by eminent domain, paying full market price.

    joe Reply:

    Zoning is the new gay. It’s real, it’s here, it’s not going away so deal with it.

    PropB is about restricting waivers to the current policy. Anyone thinking they have an entitlement to a waiver just blew a wad of cash on a politician who can’t delver.

    And for the sake of clarity – no most here could ever afford a apt in the unrestricted SF mega city of apartment towers because developers don’t make affordable units. There’s less profit in it.

    Joey Reply:

    Developers build new units which sell for high prices which in turn decreases the price of existing units, or at least makes them stop rising as fast.

    I understand the backlash against developers and the types of people they cater to but constricting the supply of housing in SF is only going to drive prices up for everyone, particularly at a time like this.

    jimsf Reply:

    not true in SF. Buidling more won’t do anything but keep prices going up as you bring more and more money into town, and all the trappings and lifestyle that go with that money, the city becomes even more desirable for the wealthy, and all properties and rents continue to rise as gentrification pressues increase.
    Over build Fresno and rents will drop. OVer build san francisco and rents will continue to rise.

    The only way to keep rents down is artificially with rent control and other regulation, or by building an adequate supply of public housing.

    Joey Reply:

    Overbuild in San Francisco and rents will rise less steeply. Don’t build and rents are going to skyrocket. This is basic economics.

    But I do agree that some legislative changes are in order:

    – Rent controls yes. They should be expanded, particularly for low-income residents.
    – Ellis Act evictions need to end.
    – Expand affordable housing minimums for new developments, possibly with additional tiers of affordability.
    – Force Peninsula cities to build housing to keep up with their job growth.
    – Don’t restrict development on underused nonresidential properties like parking lots and former industrial sites. Increase height limits where applicable. Allow economic diversification without total gentrification. Prioritize transit-adjacent sites.

    joe Reply:

    “Overbuild in San Francisco and rents will rise less steeply. ”

    Oh that’s PR Bullshit. Developers maximize profit. They build expensive apartments and condos for wealthy people – SF is an international city with an international housing market.

    ” Force Peninsula cities to build housing to keep up with their job growth”
    DONE!!! There’s a law requiring that now and Menlo Park had to add almost 2000 new units or lose the Facebook expansion permit. 600 must be low income housing.
    Enjoy: http://www.publicadvocates.org/press-releases/city-of-menlo-park-settles-housing-lawsuit

    ” Don’t restrict development on underused nonresidential properties like parking lots and former industrial sites. ”
    They don’t “restrict” development if you look at all the south of SF development which has changed that area since my mid 90’s days.

    What you could push for is NO PARKING requirements for developments. Cutting out a curb for a private driveway eliminates a public space for a private space. Mandating Parking encourages people who have and want cars. Pedestrian development encourages pedestrians.

    Joey Reply:

    Oh that’s PR Bullshit. Developers maximize profit. They build expensive apartments and condos for wealthy people – SF is an international city with an international housing market.

    Again, it’s not about how the new units are priced, but how the supply/demand dynamic affects the prices of existing units. Of course developers will cater to whoever is going to pay the most money. But that means that the people who are willing to pay a lot for a unit in SF are moving into a new one rather than bidding on existing units.

    What you could push for is NO PARKING requirements for developments. Cutting out a curb for a private driveway eliminates a public space for a private space. Mandating Parking encourages people who have and want cars. Pedestrian development encourages pedestrians.

    Agreed, and I forgot to mention that. Not only does off-street parking discourage walking, biking, and transit usage, but it takes up space that might otherwise be housing or retail and/or drives up development costs, thus driving up housing prices.

    There’s a law requiring that now and Menlo Park had to add almost 2000 new units or lose the Facebook expansion permit. 600 must be low income housing.

    It’s a start, but it’s not enough, and it’s not just Menlo Park. For instance Mountain View intends to add 2.5 times as many jobs as housing units in the next 15 years. Housing growth on the Peninsula needs to keep pace with job growth, not just lag behind less.

    joe Reply:

    Supply of high end, expensive units for international demand will never be enough. Game over in SF.

    Wealthy bid on existing units too – my old Noe Valley home for example. Next door they gutted the home and refinished the exterior of the old home. It once held 3 families (1 illegal unit in the garage area with 4 young kids) and expanded out the back and added a large deck. In moved 2 adults 1 kid and 2 BMWs.

    Homes behind and to the other side all did renovations like this: More home, more car and fewer people.

    Best solution is to put in more/better public transit and forget about HW expansion – no way they will accommodate the jobs in the locality and no way the laws will change (nearer term) to force residents to do a 1;1 job to home ratio.

    MTView by the way from 91 to now is vastly more dense.

    jimsf Reply:

    Joey Reply:
    June 4th, 2014 at 7:56 pm
    Overbuild in San Francisco and rents will rise less steeply. Don’t build and rents are going to skyrocket. This is basic economics.
    But I do agree that some legislative changes are in order:

    Yes those would all be good changes. And I have alsway insisted that the rest of the bay area cities should do their share of density before trying to dump the problem on SF.

    Meanwhile to formerly industrial southeastern waterfront has the most room for development with the least impact so long as it within reason, character and height to fit in and that is in fact where most of the development is planned.

    Joey Reply:

    Wealthy bid on existing units too – my old Noe Valley home for example.

    Yes, but how many more of them would be bidding on existing units if there weren’t also new units for them to bid on? This isn’t a binary process.

    joe Reply:

    http://www.eschatonblog.com/2013/11/can-san-francisco-build-its-way-to.html

    Today http://www.toasteatery.com/ChurchStreetLocation.html
    10 years ago the place was Hungry Joe’s and it served a $1.99 breakfast special. The old stuff that made living is SF so neat and affordable was replaced with expensive stuff wealthier people want.

    You can ride a bus to lunch on a $12.00 plate of eggs. Or carry your whole foods groceries home in a hemp reusable bag.

    I left.

    synonymouse Reply:

    You should have been there in the mid-sixties.

    Hop on the #22 for 15 cents and go to the Fillmore to see the Dead, Airplane, Janice Joplin, the Doors, Buffalo Springfield. I think it was three bucks.

    And you would talk to the old-timers who remembered the quake and fire and they would always smile and say something like “You like it now; you should have been here before the War.”

    Andrew Reply:

    @jimsf: “Meanwhile to formerly industrial southeastern waterfront has the most room for development with the least impact so long as it within reason, character and height to fit in and that is in fact where most of the development is planned.”

    Another reason SF HSR station should be built at 4th & King, not stranded at the Strands-bay Terminal:
    http://goo.gl/maps/G9Aed

    Derek Reply:

    The only way to keep rents down is artificially with rent control and other regulation, or by building an adequate supply of public housing.

    Better yet, do nothing about rents and let companies find their own way to find and keep low-wage employees.

    joe Reply:

    Let’s run an experiment because Econ majors don’t study US history.

    synonymouse Reply:

    @ Andrew

    Talk to Kopp; he agrees with you.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    If the justification for the current policy is that the waterfront is a public resource, then it’s a taking as well. In Austin there are ongoing lawsuits against zoning rules that the plaintiffs argue are takings.

    joe Reply:

    It’s justified for what ever reason people choose to vote.

    PropB regulates waivers which is an exception to the current regulations.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    It’s justified to the extent the courts think it’s not a taking.

    joe Reply:

    And no one made the legality argument against Prop B. Probably because a waiver restriction is not a taking by definition of what it means to issue a waiver.

    More importantly deep pocket owners of the Giants and Warriors folded.

    Jon Reply:

    “Zoning is the new gay”

    I think this is the stupidest thing I have ever read.

    +1 to all of Joey’s comments on this subject. It’s long been clear to me that the dividing line on this issue is not between conservatives and progressives; it’s between those who understand economics, and those who don’t.

    joe Reply:

    Dr, Duncan Black Ph.D. Econ Brown Univ.
    http://www.eschatonblog.com/2013/11/can-san-francisco-build-its-way-to.html

    I generally lean towards “build more” as an answer to housing price woes. It’s a nice simple story – increase supply of housing units, and prices should fall.

    But it’s actually too simple of a story. The character of neighborhoods and cities is affected by the number and characteristics of its inhabitants. As demand for San Francisco living from relatively rich people increases, increasingly San Francisco is filled with rich people who are driving up rents/house prices. They’re also creating demand for things – shops and services – that rich people like. So a few more Whole Foods and pricey restaurants open up, making it even more desirable for rich people. And, frankly, rich people like to live near other rich people, so simply the presence of more rich people makes the area more attractive. Driving out the poors is a feature. More rich people leads to more neighborhood amenities that rich people like which boosts demand for housing by rich people. Since they’re rich, their willingness/ability to pay for housing vastly exceeds that of mere mortals.

    Building more in San Francisco will mean that there are more spots for people to live in San Francisco, but it doesn’t necessarily mean that rents will actually fall.

    Anyone care to give an example of a neighbourhood in SF where they built more housing and rents dropped?

    Alon Levy Reply:

    SF’s housing stock growth is laughably low. How about we look at a city with higher housing stock growth, like Tokyo?

    jimsf Reply:

    yes lets make san francisco like tokyo. everyone can lived stacked on top of one another. lets fill up all the open space while we’re at it. Look at all that open space up on twin peaks and bernal park, and what about the beach…. in malibu they build on the beach. might as well cover ocena beach with houses and the presidio too. There is room in the median strip of camino del mar in sea cliff to squeeze some condos in…
    Not too mention the whole of san bruno mountain! think of the views the rich people would have!

    And if existing peoples views get blocked, we can build even higher so new views can be created and so what if no sun ever reaches street level. Street level is only for homeless people anyway.

    SAn Francisco is not tokyo, or manhattan, or sao paulo, or even vancouver. never has been, never wanted to be.
    Theres a long history of the people of SF saying very loudly over and over and over again, for decades, that they do not want the city to become those things.
    Tech and hipness is the worst thing that ever happened to the bay area. It used to just be a really nice place to live for ordinary californians who liked the weather there. Now its a clusterfuck.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    San Francisco is not a person. It has no wants. Current residents have wants, like “keep migrants out.”

    jimsf Reply:

    yes current residents – just like past residents did before them. they get a say because they live there pay taxes there and vote there. Just like people in REno get a say as to what goes on in Reno. and people in Marysville decide what happens in Marysville.

    joe Reply:

    SF has expanded housing stock and gentrified neighborhoods opening up more housing stock.
    Rents go up.

    Toyko isn’t constrained on a peninsula, not know for it;s low rents either.

    Funny how you guys pick awesome places to live and complain about rents.

    Clearly the goal is to develop the crap out of other place sin the city so rents where you want to live can drop.

    Noe Valley without the Victorians is not Noe Valley – you can live in a overbuilt 5 story condo land there and would lose interest In fact we have places with buses and walkable with low rents t but you guys always pick on unique places like Manhattan or SF and want to change it into places you can afford but don’t want to be.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    And this in general is the tendency of the time, and of the new era opening before us: to the great development of wealth; to concentration; to the differentiation of classes; to less personal independence among the many and the greater power of the few. We shall lose much which gave a charm to California life; much that was valuable in the character of our people, while we will also wear off defects, and gain some things that we lacked.

    Henry George, discussing the proliferation of wealth in San Francisco…in 1868.

    This isn’t exactly a new problem.

    jimsf Reply:

    They just didn’t build enough housing see. Now if they did something like this in san francisco the whole world could live on the cold windy tip of the penninsula. They might even put a subway under geary if they can figure out where it is.

    Jon Reply:

    No-one’s going to build five story condos in Noe Valley. Noe Valley will become more and more expensive and exclusive under any likely scenario.

    Whether or not we accelerate housing construction in other parts of SF will determine whether the people displaced by rising rents will be able to move to another neighborhood of SF, or be forced to moved to Oakland. I’m likely to be one of those people in the middle-term, so it’s in my interest for that development to happen. I live in the Castro, and I want to stay here; but If I’m forced to move, I’d rather have a mid-rise apartment in one of the eastern SF neighborhoods than a detached victorian in Oakland. If development in SF doesn’t occur, I don’t get a choice.

    Quite frankly, you don’t live here anymore, so you don’t get a say. It’s not your city anymore.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    Tokyo is actually a lot cheaper than New York, San Francisco, and their ilk these days. It’s known as a super-expensive city because it was one 25 years ago. Today, secular stagnation and extensive construction have reduced prices. For a random example that I’ve just checked, the CBD Sheraton is about $170 a night in Tokyo but $280 in New York.

    jimsf Reply:

    @jon
    the eastern waterfront is where the development will be and you probably will be able to find a place there. So might I as I could return at any moment. It will always be my city. I own a cubic foot of it at the columbarium and will live there for all eternity. Its a good location. The fog there burns off around 10am after coffee, and the new Geary BRT will be nearby.

    Joey Reply:

    joe, I’m pretty sure if nothing was built rich people would still move in, thereby displacing even more current residents. You can’t just say “rich people are moving into new housing therefore new housing is bad” – you need a scenario to compare it to.

    jimsf Reply:

    the problem isn’t the amount of housing its the amount of people. For a long time not that many people wanted to live in san francisco… you know before it became the darling of the hip and trendy. I remember times before the large management companies took over all the buildings…. when every single apartment building up and down the streets had “for rent” signs and you just rang the buzzer and the old guy would come down and show you the apartment and say well, Ive got this one for 375 and this one for 385. And youd sign the paper and move in on monday. And you had your pick of thousands of apartments all over the city!

    jimsf Reply:

    and the city was the right size. It offered big city fun with small town character. It was comfortable, had plenty of open space, was never crowded except at the wharf in summer. And it wasn’t over run with homeless people either. You just had some winos here and there. But it was a really great place to live, becuase it wasn’t la or nyc or dallas, that was the point. and it wasnt global anything or world class anything. it was very much under the global radar. and that was real nice.

    Eric Reply:

    “For a long time not that many people wanted to live in san francisco… ”

    For a long time not that many people wanted to live in any central city… but now St Louis and Cleveland are adding thousands of residential units downtown, you think SF would be immune to this?

    jimsf Reply:

    Cleveland needed it. San Francisco didn’t.

    jimsf Reply:

    If San Franciscans want to keep their waterfront as mostly public open space and put limits on development they have every right to do so and its nobody’s business. You all need to quit trying to to tell san franciscans what to do. First, because its not your business and second, because trust me, they don’t care what you think.

    Paul Druce Reply:

    Long as we get to disenfranchise San Franciscans from having a say in state politics, I’m happy with that.

    jimsf Reply:

    why? is the city in violation of state law?

    Paul Druce Reply:

    If you don’t want the rest of the state telling San Franciscans what to do it seems only proper that San Franciscans not be allowed to try and tell the rest of the state what to do.

    jimsf Reply:

    The state of california isn’t telling the city what to do. People on this blog are. Its a simple matter of residents in Sf shaping their community, the same way every single city town and county in the state of california does. Should the people of Yuba City lose their say in state politics because they decide where and where not to approve retail and housing?

    Ted Judah Reply:

    I think he Paul is talking about state politics in general. Lots of bills start from ” this worked in San Francisco, let’s try it statewide!”

    jimsf Reply:

    I think walnut creek was actually the first to enact smoking bans. SAnta Monica had some firsts too. Probably Santa Barbara too. SLO county banned plastic bags around the same time SF did or shortly after. SF doesn’t have the lead with this stuff. ITs shocking how many people smoke in SF too compared to other parts of the state.

    But none of that is SFers telling other places what to do. If other places want to follow, its their own people asking for those things.

  4. Anandakos
    Jun 4th, 2014 at 01:22
    #4

    “Neel Kashkari”? Don’t you mean “Neel Kash And Karry”? Give him the Kash and he’ll Karry your water (if you’re rich).

    Jesse D. Reply:

    Heh, I made a similar joke when I first heard his name.

    I think I posted it here as well.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Apparently Kashkari was a TARPer. Hated that crap. It will be hard to vote for him unless he specifically disparages the dogleg detour and generally Jerry’s screwed scheme.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    From his biography on Wikipedia: As interim Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Stability from October 2008 to May 2009, he was responsible for overseeing the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) that was a major component of the U.S. government’s response to the financial crisis of 2007–08.

    Really odd way to hate TARP.

    joe Reply:

    There’s an Admiral Gial Ackbar joke in there somewhere.

  5. Jesse D.
    Jun 4th, 2014 at 04:21
    #5

    And of course, our old friend Mr. Denham will ride high once again due to the farmers coming to his aid because they honestly have nothing better to do than blame “those damn kids”, bring out their 1946 Broke Ass Jalopy, and ride around celebrating a movie filmed in Pleasanton (because George Lucas is a scumbag)

    It’s only a matter of time until the old guard dies off and the new generation takes over, actually getting stuff done instead of impotently talking about it.

  6. jimsf
    Jun 4th, 2014 at 11:00
    #6

    In el Dorado County my choices were republican or…. I’ve never had to leave so many blank spots on a ballot.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    Welcome to the neighborhood…El Do is a nothing if not quirky.

    jimsf Reply:

    I can’t figure it out. It covers a such a stretch of totally different regions and such a mix of people. I just know that I don’t care much for Placerville. Seems a bit of a trash heap with a bad vibe. I avoid it.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    I actually almost ended up working for the County not that long ago. It’s a very interesting place relative to the rest of the State. It also is a great candidate for HSR someday…

    If you ever want to get lunch sometime, let me know.

    jimsf Reply:

    Oh you live in EDC too then?

    Ted Judah Reply:

    Folsom, actually, which I almost think fits better with EDC than Sac county.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    nothing stopping you from writing things in. You like Disney, Donald Duck, Mickey Mouse, Snow White….

    jimsf Reply:

    Ah yes I should of wrote in Debbie Harry but I know she wouldn’t want any of the jobs.
    I think I saw where a democrat actually won a position in Hanford which I find to be quite shocking!

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    If you leave the ballot blank they don’t have any idea why you left it blank. If you write something in they get a bit of a clue. Write in Debbie Harry, she won’t get enough votes and her getting the job is remote.

    jimsf Reply:

    Well I will do that in November for sure and I’ll let her know when I see her in October.

    Zorro Reply:

    In the 16th State Senate District I read that Jean Fuller(GOP) ran unopposed.

    Eric Reply:

    There were more than a couple House seats in the 2012 General Election where the candidate ran unopposed.

  7. Trentbridge
    Jun 4th, 2014 at 14:21
    #7

    With every precinct reporting, Del Norte County residents voted against seceding from California by 59 percent to 41 percent. Voters in Siskiyou County voted against Measure C by a 56 percent to 44 percent margin; that measure would have established the Jefferson Republic, one step toward creating a new state.

    Phew! I was really worried about that one!

  8. Keith Saggers
    Jun 4th, 2014 at 14:55
    #8
  9. jimsf
    Jun 4th, 2014 at 19:16
    #9

    I don’t know why anti obama sentiment is so high. I don’t think its our political system or our politicians at fault. I think americans have become un realistic, spoiled, disagreeable, fussy, short sighted, narrow minded, and ungovernable. They simply refuse to be happy with anything.

    In most cases people griping, don’t even know what they are griping about.
    Guns! No one from the government has come to your house and taken your gun.
    Freedom! You have a house, a car, kids in school, your health, food in the fridge, a fridge to put food in, a smart phone, and an SUV and the ability to run your mouth off about anything anytime.. what freedom are you missing? You don’t even know.
    California taxes and regulations- no wonder everyone is leaving…. everyone isn’t leaving. they are comeing here in droves because the economy is good, the wages are high. The housing market has recovered, prices are up, its a prosperous, desiable place.

    why all the pissing and moaning.

    Conservatives will never get over the fact that they lost big, twice, to a black man. They can’t stand it. It makes them absolutely bat shit furious and they don’t know what to do. I say that as a middle aged white guy…. trust me, i see it. Their heads just want to explode over it.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Their heads wanted to explode over Clinton too. They are pissed off that they can’t force all of us to live in what they think 1955 was like. Even 1955 wasn’t like what they think 1955 was like.

    EJ Reply:

    I feel like the last Republican President who inspired real hatred was Reagan. Maybe I just got that impression because I was fairly young at the time, my Dad is an old-school Scottish socialist, and he identified Reagan with Margaret Thatcher.

    I mean, GHWB seemed like a dignified, reasonable dude, just not great at Presidentin’, and as bad as GWB was, he seemed like such a dolt you couldn’t work up a real hate against him.

    But man, people HATED Reagan; he got a little bit of a bounce after he handled getting shot with such aplomb, but remember Iran-Contra?

    Eric Reply:

    Bush=Hitler and Bush=chimp don’t count?

    I think that ever since the right-wing and left-wing created separate news forums that reinforce each group’s biases, irrational hatred of the other side’s leader has been unavoidable.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    Most frustratin was watching liberal elites pounce on Bush being inarticulate and then causing other Dems to underestimate his natural intelligence which was fairly high. Still, all it would take is a good haircut to end the comparisons to chimp, baboons, howler monkeys…

    synonymouse Reply:

    Yeah, the TARPers really took advantage of W’s iq.

    He should have told the “gnomes” of TARP to take a hike right away unless they want to vacation in Guantanamo.

    John Nachtigall Reply:

    When Bush won the second term I remember reading the articles about liberals saying there were going to move to Canada.

    Bush was way more hated than Regan

    jimsf Reply:

    The current batch of teabagging asshats and their do nothing congress makes me yearn for the days of reagan bush

    Alan Reply:

    A lot of baggers, up to and including Rush Limbaugh, made the same promise if Obama was reelected. El Rushbo is still blowing hot air in Florida.

    joe Reply:

    Wait until Hillary.
    Black men were granted suffrage in 1870, white women in 1920.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Electing the governor’s wife was quite popular among the Tea Party types back in the day. Or the Mayor’s wife etc. Michelle in ’16. If their heads are gonna explode it should be something that’s really showy.

    EJ Reply:

    We could do a lot worse than Michelle for President. She’s a smart, strong woman.

    jimsf Reply:

    Id actually prefer Michelle over Hillary. But HIllary is probably the most qualified person on earth for the job right now.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Except that we’d spend her whole administration rehashing blue dresses, travel agents, blue dresses, shady stock deals, blue dresses, Vince Foster, blue dresses….

    Ted Judah Reply:

    I am pretty sure Jerry Brown could do a better job than Hillary. Elizabeth Warren, too.

    jimsf Reply:

    jerry brown would be a good choice with warren as vice.

    Mac Reply:

    overstated. Obama is only 1/2 black, was raised by a white mother and white grandparents… why is everything attributed to race?

    Alon Levy Reply:

    Hypodescent.

    Also, he looks black.

    jimsf Reply:

    Is what he represents. The general demographic shift. Fear. Ive just heard a little extra of it this being an election week. Reading local commentary, etc. Word of advice… never read the comments section. ( except on this blog)

    Ted Judah Reply:

    Exactly. Obama is a daily reminder to the John Birch society that we are not in Kansas anymore. It’s also a very tough reminder to America’s petty bourgeioisie that the plutocrats will turn on them for cheap labor no matter what the consequence.

    Alan Reply:

    If you think it’s overstated, you haven’t been paying attention for the past 5+ years.

    EJ Reply:

    Many, if not most, African-Americans have some degree of white heritage. Race has a lot to do with perception, and the vast majority of Americans of all races perceive Obama as black, regardless of his parentage or his upbringing.

  10. jimsf
    Jun 4th, 2014 at 19:24
    #10

    The train will eat up vast swaths of prime farmland! No more than does that taxpayer funded canal that brings other peoples water to your farm so you can make profit on top of your subsidies.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Real American(tm) use highways that eat up more land, to their McMansions that use up more land, that can be in arid areas because canals that use up more land bring them water, so that’s okay. Unreal Americans, or is it Real Unamericans, ride trains so that’s an abomination.

    jimsf Reply:

    Im not even opposed to people living in arid mcmansions and eating up land. Its their inability to take their heads out of the self involved asses long enough to be reasonable about the fact that theirs is not the only way to live and they, like the rest of DO have a responsibility to plan for the future. Worst generation ever.

  11. morris brown
    Jun 5th, 2014 at 15:58
    #11

    As we approach State budget approval time, it is appropriate to review the lack of funding for the HSR project.  The March 27th hearing in DeSaulnier’s committee, produced much information.  The committee produced a summary report of the hearing which can in full be viewed at:

    http://stran.senate.ca.gov/sites/stran.senate.ca.gov/files/1565-S_Publication_Book_.pdf

    from this report we read….

    Despite the recognized progress in the Draft 2014 Business Plan, the chair and subsequent witnesses identified a central, overriding risk to the success of high-speed rail: the lack of a specific plan to address a large shortfall in funding for the initial operating segment. Testimony by Mr. Fraysse estimated this shortfall as $21 billion. Mr. Thompson further estimated that, even under the most favorable projections of stable funding from a healthy cap and trade auction revenue program proposed by the governor, this $21 billion shortfall would only be reduced to approximately $15 billion. Moreover, the chair emphasized that these cost estimates do not include cost overruns, particularly likely to occur on high-speed rail projects that can exceed four times the initial estimates. Professor Ibbs emphasized the tendency of megaprojects to incur cost overruns, both on capital expenditures and also on operations and maintenance.

    The chair asked how the HSRA plans to address the funding shortfall. Mr. Morales pointed to private financing that can leverage state funding, but Mr. Morales provided no specific plans or proposals. The chair noted the short period of time – about three months – before the legislature must vote on the administrations proposed budget, and urged Mr. Morales to provide the committee with a detailed spreadsheet, the sooner the better, of specific funding plans or proposals to address the shortfall. Similarly, Mr. Thompson remarked on the need for the HSRA to move from possibilities to proposals for funding the high-speed rail project and overall program.

    Indeed on the issue of future cost escalation, since this report was issued the Fresno to Bakersfield EIR was released, and indeed already a $1 billion increase in cost projection for this section was revealed.

    Time for the Legislature to pull the plug on this boondoggle.

    Zorro Reply:

    Pulling the plug on HSR isn’t going to happen.

    synonymouse Reply:

    So you think Jerry has the stones and hubris to slip Tutor the next contract?

    joe Reply:

    Time for the Legislature to pull the plug on this boondoggle.

    Why is it that you guys can’t elect politicians that will cancel HSR? All you need is a simple majority.
    Your guy, Jerry Hill. He helped assure the HSR project would run along the peninsula.

    Risk? Why that was brought up in the Appellate Court on May 23rd. A judge commented that the State successfully built the CV water project with less assurances than are in place for the HSR bonds.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Sorry, can’t touch that. The Legislature is a “legal” example of an organized crime family.

    synonymouse Reply:

    More in character would be “We shall speak no more of this.”

  12. Ted Judah
    Jun 5th, 2014 at 17:55
    #12

    Don’t look now, but one of my predictions might actually come true:

    http://m.sacbee.com/sacramento/db_99761/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=b3Qh1m9L

    synonymouse Reply:

    Yeah, use minimum wage slaves’ sales tax to subvent an auto maker in a semi-desert State that could very well turn out a contemporary Tucker, Kaiser, Nash, Willys, Studebaker, Packard.

    It always takes the mainstream auto companies a while to bring around their big guns when they finally sense a threat out there. Isn’t BMW ready to launch a Tesla clone?

    synonymouse Reply:

    Let’s not forget Hudson, which starred in one of the Porkys franchise.

    Michael Reply:

    Nothing wrong with a Willys.

    synonymouse Reply:

    I loved Packards, Studebakers and Hudsons. I just hope Ford survives.

    swing hanger Reply:

    The problem with Ford is the Edsel looked too much like it needed a Willys…

    synonymouse Reply:

    Ford needed the Mustang not the Edsel. But then it took Detroit years to be dragged kicking and screaming to see the market for small cars and sports cars.

    There is still more money in huge trucks and suvs for Detroit.

    JB in PA Reply:

    Kicking and screaming at the same time as we when through the hell of early smog control technology.

  13. Donk
    Jun 5th, 2014 at 21:58
    #13

    Let me know when I will get to vote Darrell Issa out of office. I am embarrassed to live in a place represented by that douchebag.

    synonymouse Reply:

    They are all douchebags.

    synonymouse Reply:

    TWU 250A are douchebags.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    Did you recently get exiled to Temecula? Your comments always sounded like you live about five feet away from Henry Waxman….

  14. datacruncher
    Jun 6th, 2014 at 13:13
    #14

    There are still lots of mail and provisional ballots to count around the state. So the Controller results will change.

    But its interesting to look at the results update as of today (June 6) at 10:29am. Perez and Yee are now running 3rd and 4th.
    http://www.sfgate.com/politics/article/John-P-rez-falls-into-third-in-controller-s-race-5534308.php
    Ashley Swearengin (Rep) 769,427 24.7%
    David Evans (Rep) 674,963 21.6%
    John A. Pérez (Dem) 672,040 21.6%
    Betty T. Yee (Dem) 664,916 21.3%

    Ashley Swearengin lost some endorsements on the right due to her support of High Speed Rail. But so far that does not seem to have cost her support in areas like Kern and Kings Counties.
    http://vote.sos.ca.gov/returns/maps/controller/

  15. Jos Callinet
    Jun 6th, 2014 at 16:11
    #15

    Two news reports currently circulating may not directly impact how Californians vote in November, but each in its own way should give us pause.

    The first report on President Obama himself suggest that it is becoming more likely than ever that the Democrats may be swept out of control of BOTH houses of Congress this November on Obama’s rapidly-fraying coattails. Definitely worth the read! http://finance.yahoo.com/news/relentless-incompetence-americans-giving-obama-100000019.html

    The second of these two articles focuses on Congress’ abysmal failure to take action to rebuild America at a time when optimally-low borrowing costs should be a prime incentive to take action NOW – we’re squandering what may be our last and best chance in a long time to get the job done at the least cost: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/congress-blowing-huge-opportunity-rebuild-101500509.html

    California’s chances for building its HSR project may very well be harmed by these unfortunate developments taking place outside its borders!

  16. John Burrows
    Jun 6th, 2014 at 17:12
    #16

    Obama’s coattails appear to be getting a bit longer—-Rasmussen has his approval rating at 51%, disapproval 47%—Up slightly over the last two months. Not enough here to call it a trend, but let’s relax a little and see what happens between now and November.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    Rasmussen’s had the highest Obama approval rates of all the pollsters for quite some time now. It’s also consistently had the best Democratic performance on the generic Congressional ballot.

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