Jerry Brown: “I’m Going To Build Great Things, And I’m Not Going To Be Intimidated”

May 19th, 2014 | Posted by

Great video of Governor Jerry Brown’s meeting with the San Francisco Chronicle editorial board, a body which has been swinging to the right lately even as California continues to undergo a long-term shift toward the left. Specifically, the clip below shows Governor Brown giving strong support to the high speed rail project, showing a vision that is too often lacking in Sacramento:

[clip disabled due to obnoxious autoplay; view it on the SF Chronicle website]

Governor Brown then appeared on ABC’s This Week show to slam Republicans for denying that climate change is real, and pointing out that California’s drought and fires are the product of a warming planet.

Surely given such a crisis, you’d think that editorial boards across the state would support any and every effort to reduce CO2 emissions, including HSR.

  1. Jon
    May 19th, 2014 at 11:02
    #1

    Robert, please disable autoplay!

    Robert Cruickshank Reply:

    Yikes, didn’t realize it was enabled. Not sure if I have the ability to do so, but if not, I’ll remove the embed and instead use a link.

    Eric Reply:

    Thank you. It’s refreshing to visit one of the rare internet sites these days that respects you and shows you what you came looking for, rather than manipulating you into viewing the maximum amount of advertising that it can.

    Jon Reply:

    Thanks!

    Matthew F. Reply:

    You are my hero!

  2. Zorro
    May 19th, 2014 at 11:46
    #2

    Caltrain electrification RFQ issued

    Caltrain on Friday, May 16, 2014 released an RFQ (Request for Qualification) for the electrification portion of its Modernization Program, which includes operating electric service with new, high-performance rolling stock between San Francisco and San Jose by 2019.

    Emmanuel Reply:

    How can we talk about electrification already? If Caltrain wants electrification they should damn pay for it themselves.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    The yokels in Bumfuck want paved roads they should pay for it themselves.
    And BTW the people along the Caltrain line pay California and Federal taxes. Lots and lots and lots of taxes that go to paving roads in Fumbuck and welfare benefits in Bugtussle.

  3. John Nachtigall
    May 19th, 2014 at 18:10
    #3

    I really like Brown although we disagree on almost all issues, except fiscal conservatism. He is at least genuine and consistent and I like the energy. A leader that does not run at the first sign of trouble.

    At least with him in charge we are committed to a direction, even if it is a direction I am not a big fan of.

    Nathanael Reply:

    Yeah. I envy California for Jerry Brown… over here in NY we have Andrew Cuomo, who seems intent on standing for nothing at all.

  4. Alon Levy
    May 19th, 2014 at 19:26
    #4

    Richard will love this: Muni’s light rail vehicles have an MDBF of 3,774 miles (link). Friends don’t let friends buy from Breda. Or from a defense contractor that’s never made trains before.

    synonymouse Reply:

    I believe LA is also unhappy with the Breda LRV, which makes me think the manufacturer is at least partly responsible for any shortcomings.

    With Muni you have to remember no-show maintenance. Put it this way there is no resale market for Muni diesel buses whereas GGT’s coaches do get purchased.

    The one exception were the Muni’s GE-equipped Marmon Herrington trolley coaches when went to Guadalajara. They were excellent vehicles and handled Muni conditions admirably. Goes to show it is possible to build a trolley coach that can take punishment if you plan for them to last three times longer than a diesel bus.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Anybody who buys Breda stuff is unhappy.

    Nathanael Reply:

    Yeah — in addition to SF and LA, Boston can tell horrible stories about Breda light rail cars. That’s three of the four places they’ve sold them in the US!

    Cleveland doesn’t seem to have complained about theirs, but they got them back in 1981, so complaints might not have been on the Internet.

    Washington Metro is unhappy with their Breda subway cars as well. Atlanta’s been relatively quiet, but apparently theirs are problematic as well.

    Denmark and the Netherlands ended up suing AnsaldoBreda over unfinished and unsatisfactory high speed rail cars.

    Several of the European cities which bought their streetcars have complained too, including IIRC Goteborg and Athens.

    Just don’t buy Breda. They should be disqualified from all bids at this point; this is a lot of failures in a row.

    synonymouse Reply:

    The patronage machine buys whoever payolas best and most.

    joe Reply:

    CHAIN GANGS

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/05/02/brevard-county-sheriff-chain-gang/2130335/

    Controversial Sheriff Joe Arpaio in Arizona’s Maricopa County, known for his tough law-and-order stance, has had male chain gangs since 1995, female chain gangs since 1996 and chain gangs for juveniles convicted as adults since 2004.

    You love it wouldn’t you.

    I think they could put it on Pay TV and make money – right.

    Donk Reply:

    Not sure why you are posting this here. I also don’t see the problem with chain gangs – lets make all of them work. And I like Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s idea where he made all prisoners wear pink jumpsuits. Sheriff Joe had some good ideas in the earlier days, then he just went off the deep end and totally ruined his credibility.

    Zorro Reply:

    Agreed, pink is just a color, in California prisoners are said to wear orange, beyond that I don’t anything about what prisoners wear.

    Reedman Reply:

    The only bidder on the eBART trains was Stadler. Is it good that Stadler is the suppllier, or is it bad that there is no competition and no other supplier wanted the business?

    synonymouse Reply:

    I wonder how many will bid on Son of Acela.

    wdobner Reply:

    The Stadler GTW 2/6’s reliability speaks for itself. I’ve only heard of a few mishaps on NJT’s Riverline attributable to the rolling stock over the past decade.

    Max Wyss Reply:

    Stadler is a well reputated supplier, and they do care about small orders (if you order one vehicle for a certain use, they will build it for you (of course, at a price), whereas the “big” ones may not even confirm the reception of your RFQ. About the GTW 2/6, more than 500 units (in various incarnations) are running out there, and from what I read and heard, the customers are quite happy with them. So, one can say that the choice is definitely not bad.

    The fact that there was only one bidder may have several reasons. It could be that there are requirements in the requests which make the “big” ones stay away (but don’t matter that much to smaller manufacturers). That could be the above mentioned small number of vehicles. Having only one bidder does, of course, reduce the range of negotiation for the customer. However, the price for a vehicle is comparable to others in the US (Denton). That means that the price may be high, but not overly high.

    And what really should matter is not the buying price, but the Total Cost of Ownership (which takes into account maintenance and operation over the lifespan of the vehicle, and its dismantling).

    synonymouse Reply:

    I think you want “well reputed”.

    Don’t mean to be pedantic.

    Max Wyss Reply:

    Naaah, no pedantism at all…

    There are false friends plopping up when you have to switch continuously between 4 languages, and English is an acquired one…

    synonymouse Reply:

    Feel free to correct my fractured French at any time.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Speaking of which how about that SNCF “rames” scandal, carried on France 2, which makes one think of BART screw-ups.

    Max Wyss Reply:

    Yeah, that sounds pretty embarassing.

    First, however, 2000 trains is simply wrong; it is 2000 carbodies.

    Also, some of the work which has to be done might have become necessary anyway because of the accessibility regulations ( Vive les règles ADA … )

    It kind of looks as if RFF does not have a proper loading gauge information system. This will get them under pretty hard pressure the next time they are going to increase the access fees…

    And it also looks as if SNCF has not much of a clew about the loading gauges as well.

    I am sure that eventually, the industry press will have some reasonable information.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Max, uninstall the kewl kidz spell checker. :-)
    … I’m sure you didn’t mean that SNCF is ineffectually using the bottom of sails to inform them about rails and platforms etc.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d3/Parts_of_a_sail.svg

    Max Wyss Reply:

    No, but what if I said they had no nail? (nail is “clou” in French)

    BTW, I found “clew” in the sense of “clue” in a book about 100 years old…

    Alon Levy Reply:

    A good rule of thumb is that every mistake in English that people make was considered correct once. 100 years is unusually recent, though – usually you have to go back to the 17th century and such.

    EJ Reply:

    I’ve seen “clew” for “clue” in modern British media – I think in the UK it’s a valid alternate spelling.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    When I check

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/spellcheck/british/?q=clew

    it says it doesn’t have an entry.

    joe Reply:

    Origin of CLUE

    alteration of clew
    First Known Use: 1596
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clue

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Back then you spelled things the way you wanted to, there weren’t any dictionaries or spelling police. It wasn’t unusual for someone to spell the same word different ways on the same page.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Our nannies are working on the spelling police; but first a Commission must be in place.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    i thought you were aiming for some clever Italglish. It’s not your fault English doesn’t work in a predictable way.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    Eh. I’ve seen native English speakers use the word orientated instead of oriented. And I’ve seen people from many backgrounds commit the worst sin against language: two spaces after a period.

    aw Reply:

    I learned my keyboarding skills on a typewriter. Two spaces after a period is the only correct way to do it.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    I learned mine on a computer. One is the only correct way. Thankfully, when working in shared documents, it is a lot easier to passive-aggressively search-and-replace other people’s two spaces than for them to do the same to my correct space.

    EJ Reply:

    I learned two spaces on a typewriter, but one seems to be the standard now. A few years ago I just said screw it and set autocorrect to change two spaces to one, because I could never shake the habit of hitting space twice after a period.

    Max Wyss Reply:

    The two spaces after a period is – as far as I can see – specifically USAn. Anywhere else, and in good typography, it is a single space (but then, we’d have to specify which space).

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    ….. you’ve never had to pass a typing test to get permission to submit an application have you? It’s two spaces at the end of a sentence.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    No, we had computer labs at school and were expected to print essays.

    jonathan Reply:

    In what language? Does that make a difference to the conventional number of spaces after a ful-stop?

    Alon Levy Reply:

    First Hebrew, then English. I have never seen anyone recommend two spaces after a period in Hebrew, but I’ve also never seen a lot of spelling and punctuation arguments in Hebrew that I’ve seen in English.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    How quaint, putting things on macerated trees. I stopped doing that in the 80s. The people giving typing tests stopped doing that in the 80s.

    In Libre Office and I assume Open office you want format>paragraph>alignment>justified.

    But then I also learned how to type on a manual and this foderol about fonts and and justification and proportional spacing and bolding… is for people who want to hide that they don’t have much to say. If you can’t say it in plain text are you sure you want to say it?

    …the spell checker in Firefox says I spelled “folderol” incorrectly. Merriam Webster disagrees.

    …now if they could just give me a free thesaurus that works as well as a paper unabridged Roget’s.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    הרחפת שלי מלאה בצלופחים

    …lets see what WordPress does to something in two alphabets..

    It’s smart enough to left justify when it’s alone in the text box.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    הרחפת שלי מלאה בצלופחים

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    …I’m remembering wrong. Or I pasted something along with the text.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    WordPress does it right. Facebook has a switch that makes it automatically decide that your comment was actually Hebrew with some English, rather than the opposite. So if you want to write an English comment with more than about one Hebrew word, it will automatically format it to be right-to-left.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    I’m remembering what my RSS reader does. It right justified everything.

    Max Wyss Reply:

    Without knowing more details, it appears as if AnsaldoBreda (or what the company was named back then) knows best how to play the RFQ game.

    EJ Reply:

    What does AnsaldoBreda make that’s good? Seems like they have issues all over the world.

    Meanwhile here in San Diego we’re just finally retiring our original Siemens-Duewag U2 cars from 1981, and our Siemens S70s are both cheaper and vastly more reliable than Muni’s Bredas.

    synonymouse Reply:

    San Diego is the coolest – you are fortunate to be able to live there.

    EJ Reply:

    It was actually a serious question though – seems like worldwide AnsaldoBreda is a fairly problematical company to deal with, yet they still get plenty of contracts, not just in SF.

    Max Wyss Reply:

    As stated, (but I may be wrong) they do read the RFQ very well, and adjust the price so that they get the contract. I mean, when the price is weighted more than 50% or 80%, then you know what to do… Unfortunately, the legislation for government contracts puts too much emphasis on the price.

    Ah, yeah, and it requires the people writing the RFQ to know the game as well…

  5. synonymouse
    May 19th, 2014 at 21:02
    #5

    Jerry Brown is intimidated by the Tejon Ranch Co.

    Michael Reply:

    Syn- I don’t get your repeated Tejon rants. If I was Tejon and was working on an upscale, exurban new town at I-5/138, I’d lobby hard for the HSR and a station to replace Palmdale to get the residents into Burbank and LA in 20-30 minutes. What is your rationale for your assumed presumption that Tejon Ranch is anti-Tejon HSR?

    synonymouse Reply:

    They got Van Ark fired for even broaching the notion of revisiting Tejon.

    PB was specifically instructed not to encroach on their property in any alignments.

    As obvious as is the direct route(Musk’s default alignment as well as SNCF)the LA Times never even brings up the humongous detour to which Jerry and PBHSR are committed. You’d think the Tejon Mountain Village golf course was the holiest of holies.

    The Tejon Ranch Co. is the mother of NIMBY’s; PAMPA are hsr cheerleaders by comparison.

    Michael Reply:

    “PB was specifically instructed not to encroach on their property in any alignments.” Your source?

    Tejon Ranch extends across the Tehachapi alignment, so…?

    http://tejonranch.com/wp-content/uploads/regional_map.pdf

    synonymouse Reply:

    The eastern side of the Tejon Ranch is the ghetto part, close to the “desert rats” that Antonovich wants to run out and replace with yuppies.

    The Tejon Mountain Village is the upscale part, too toney for the likes of hsr. Railroads so hoi polloi and blighty.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    For the last time:

    van Ark was never going to last long given that Brown’s appointees favored Morales. What sealed the deal was van Ark suggesting the State revisit SNCF-Alstom’s proposal for I-5. Given van Ark’s prior work with Alstom, it made it seem as if van Ark’s political acumen (or lack thereof) was too big an impediment going forward.

    The Metropolitan Water District, meanwhile, is too busy sucking out the water stored underneath Tejon Ranch to build anything above it.

    jonathan Reply:

    Yep. so CHSRA gets Mr. East-Span-Overruns-and-major-Engineering-Failure, instead.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    “He who has made no mistakes has made nothing.”

    Even the best transit administrator earth will come with some baggage. You can’t be battle-tested without scars.

    synonymouse Reply:

    No mistakes; the bad planning is on purpose to maximize profits.

    Willie Bayconic Bridge.

    jonathan Reply:

    Baggage? You call a multi-billion dollar cost overruns, and major engineering failures, “baggage”? Or “battle scars”? This isn’t battle, it’s *civil engineering*, for crying out loud.
    You know, using known materials and techniques?

    When your independent inspectors start reporting flaws in your steel, you don’t fire those inspectors and hire different ones. You fire the steel manufacturer, and find one which makes the steel parts to spec. And you don’t build a bridge with rods made of a galvanized steel which has been banned fo ruse in bridges (due to its liability to crack).
    Guess what Morales’ organization did.

    jonathan Reply:

    …. to be fair, those debacles came after Morales resigned as Director of Caltrains in .. .2004?

    But his tenure as Director spanned much of the .. eight? years when Caltrains and MTC spent, and spent, and spent, studying the Bay Bridge; building nothing. The projected price of the East span more than doubled during that period.

    jonathan Reply:

    here is some relevant bedtime reading:

    http://stran.senate.ca.gov/sites/stran.senate.ca.gov/files/DeWolkreportfinal.pdf

    Seems Mark DeSaulnier agrees with Richard M.: the TBPOC (chaired by Steve Heminger) should be subject to normal Califoria open-governmen laws.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    No, no, it’s not a cost overrun if ground hasn’t broken yet! Cost overruns before construction are just cost estimates that become more accurate. By pure magic they always become more accurate upward, especially after the referendum or public hearing has been held.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    I am not defending Morales; I am pointing out whoever has experience will have skeletons in his or her closet.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    Tom Prendergast.

    jonathan Reply:

    Ted, excuse me. If that wasn’t “defending Morales”, I don’t know what would be.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Have the orderly loosen the foil will ya?

    EJ Reply:

    Not Tejon Ranch, but Tejon Mountain Village. CAHSRA specifically stated in their EIR that any encroachment on TMV was not permissible. I don’t have time to look up chapter and verse, but Clem cited it in his post on Tejon last year.

    synonymouse Reply:

    TMV is a project of the Ranch, as I understand it.

    EJ Reply:

    Of course, but I was responding to Michael’s post that the Tehachapi alignment crosses Tejon Ranch. It’s still mind-boggling to me that CAHSRA’s cheerleaders routinely dismiss the idea that CAHSRA deliberately avoided TMV as a conspiracy theory, when it’s explicitly stated in the EIR.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Yeah, the Cheerleaders’ giving an unlimited, unqualified, unilateral pass to the Tejon Ranch’s really unconstitutional embargo is just mind-boggling. You cannot slap a toll on a natural transport chokepoint(an embargo is the ultimate toll).

    After that they should not utter a word about PAMPA.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    It’s the mind rays the dead Chandlers send out that make him that way.

    synonymouse Reply:

    http://mountainenterprise.com/story/casino-talk-increases-as-branch-of-tejon-tribe-wins-federal-recognition-2720/

    “The Bakersfield Californian (which has Tejon Ranch CEO Bob Stine on its board) ”

    All you need to know about who is intimidating Jerry Brown. California is as corrupt as it gets. Vote for Leland Yee – between yours truly, daughters and a friend we gave him 4 votes. These ritchie riches are a thousand times more crooked than Shrimp Boy.

    Nathanael Reply:

    “California is as corrupt as it gets….”

    You have no idea how corrupt things can get. Try visiting Chicago or New York.

    synonymouse Reply:

    A 50 mile detour and five extra billion and 40 miles of tunnel to take care of some real estate developers is what I term world class corruption. And the pollyanna airheads think it is Disneyland. Vote for Leland Yee and Shrimp Boy.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    Didn’t the Japanese under Tanaka build the original “Train to Nowhere” in the 1970s with the Joetsu Shinkansen for like 6.3 billion US?

    Call me when the Legislature approves funding for a new spur between Malibu and Barbara Boxer’s house in Rancho Mirage. Until them, this is sweetheart deal territory, but not corruption….

    synonymouse Reply:

    Richard Blum should not be allowed to have any investment in Tutor.

    Travis D Reply:

    If California is as corrupt as it gets then what does that make New Jersey? Is it so corrupt it goes all the way back around and becomes uncorrupt?

    And we have explained to you many times the rationale for the “detour” and you continue to just not accept it. That you won’t accept reality is your problem, not anybody elses.

    synonymouse Reply:

    There is no rationale for the Mojave detour other than corruption engendered by Palmdale real estate developers and nimbyism of the Tejon Ranch Co.

    If there is any general principle to be drawn here it would be a collateral of “too big to fail, too big to jail” on the part of the expansionist Brown-Pelosi patronage machine.

    Residents of New Jersey are simply more experienced and worldly than ludicrously naive, credulous Californians. Maybe it is the smog or the medical maryjane or yoga. Maybe Adirondacker’s mind waves, generated by interfacing with too much I-CRAP.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Vote for Leland Yee.

    Free Rizzo and Shrimp Boy.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    If you are talking about his Girthiness who thought pissing away 8 billion dollars of other people’s was a good idea so that he would look good to primary voters in Alabama and the Dakotas the people of New Jersey weren’t thinking about that when they reelected him.

    synonymouse Reply:

    It is good that Christie’s seaminess came out relatively early on.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    He’s turning into the Giuliani of 2016–untouchable, oy. My bet is the GOP nominee will be Huckabee.

    synonymouse Reply:

    It is Hillary vs. Mitt.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    It’s going to be a Democrat from Planet Earth and frothing Tea Partier. A repeat of 2012 but with bigger majority for the Democrat.

    synonymouse Reply:

    It is the Coronation of Hillary.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    It was the coronation of Hillary in 2007.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    There was an Obama then. The only available one now is term-limited.

  6. Alan Kandel
    May 20th, 2014 at 11:14
    #6

    “Growth plan taking hits from all sides” (http://www.valleyair.org/recent_news/News_Clippings/2014/InTheNews_05-19-14.pdf).

    From the Bakersfield Californian article:

    “So how do you grow your population and reduce the number of miles cars travel?”

    Long story short, all the discussion about meeting 2020 and 2035 greenhouse gas emissions targets and no mention of railways. Sad! Why places like Bakersfield aren’t thinking and talking something above and beyond highways is beyond me.

    synonymouse Reply:

    CEO of Tejon Ranch sits on that newspaper’s board.

    Alan Kandel Reply:

    Why would the article author mention railways? It’s the community at large, apparently, that has overlooked the train as a viable transportation option. Discussion comes from within the community which the article author then reports on. I seriously doubt Tejon Ranch CEO had any bearing on what was reported on in this case. Just a guess.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    There aren’t enough people in sprawling metro Bakersfield to need a rail line for intra-metro travel.

    synonymouse Reply:

    Yeah, Boonies BART will be a total bust.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Bakersfield to Fresno isn’t intrA-metro.

    Clem Reply:

    Fresno Area Rapid Transit?

    swing hanger Reply:

    Powered by California raisins.

    joe Reply:

    Yes Clem. You should hear bus horn blow.

    Sounds like the Fine Arts & Radio Television Center at U of MT which Carol O’Conner (Archie Bunker) contributed. They changed the name when the sign was printed to Performing Arts & Radio Television
    http://map.umt.edu/place/36#18/46.86357/-113.98512

    Their still is the Fine Art School http://www.umt.edu/art/

    Alan Kandel Reply:

    Yeah, I’ve heard that argument before. But according to the Bakersfield Californian article, county population is expected to grow to 1 million by 2020. So, by 2020 and assuming an 80 percent urban population metric, 800,000 in the greater Bakersfield area. Even at 50 percent urban population metric, that’s a half-million people. Encouraging smart growth, denser, mixed-use, location-efficient development, rail transit is most certainly doable. Couple this to HSR and good connectivity results. The highway/roadway/suburban-exurban sprawl model is unsustainable.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    Bakersfield is the last frontier from transit on California. The town runs on oil money and is no hurry to change. 1 million is low for needing rail lines, however. Smallest metro area in the West with light rail is currently Salt Lake City. New Orleans has streetcars with a population at about 1.5 million. Keep in mind those cities also have lots of out of town visitors.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    I’d save the last frontier language for when LA gets its metro area transit mode share out of the single digits.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    I think you need to spend more time here in California (wanna visit?). LA’s transit mode share was always low because of distances involved. It’s why I get on The SoCal contingent here about Metrolink. BART, WMATA, the London Tube are versatile transit systems. But a far flung network of light rail will get you nowhere, fast. San Jose is finding this out the hard way. LA, Phoenix, Denver, Seattle… All just keeping pissing in the wind.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    BART has less than half the ridership of the DC Metro, so to the extent SF has high transit ridership by US standards, it’s because of high transit use in the core, not whatever boonies BART goes to.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    WMATA has very high ridership compared to comparable cities in the US for two crucial reasons. One, many big federal employers are in concentrated areas with zero parking and it is free or nearly free for federal employees.

    BART, on the other hand, is way more expensive. Unless you work in San Francisco, you get to work some other way.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    If the city doesn’t have rail it’s not comparable. If there is no subway people can’t get on the subway.

    joe Reply:

    First DC Metro area has a booming economy thanks to mucho contractor jobs.

    Secondly compare BART to DC METRO
    Here’s a map of the DC METRO system
    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:WMATA_Silver_Line_proposed_map.png

    Look just like BART right?

    DC brings in commuters from park and ride stations exactly as BART does and it’s subway system for the DC area with high density jobs. Ted’s made that point.

    It is much more extensive and well funded system – apparently being used by the Feds and conservative think tanks base in DC (e.g. CATO Inst) creates a bi-partisan consensus that expansion and expensive, frequent stations is cost effective.

    I know of no equal to L’Enfant Plaza with air conditioned, underground shopping food courts and access to hotel. Also junction of the B Line O Line G Line Y Line http://www.wmata.com/rail/station_detail.cfm?station_id=82

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    A booming economy doesn’t double ridership on a system. It’s not more extensive, 104 route miles for BART versus 106 route miles for Metro. DC put subway where subway is an appropriate solution. They upzoned around the stations, they are growing a secondary business district out in Virginia. Metro is doing something or things right and BART isn’t.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    What Adi said. I think this ultimately comes from Christoph Spieler.

    Also? The whole “Washington has tons of jobs” argument makes it sound like San Francisco is Erie, Pennsylvania. It isn’t; it has tons of jobs of its own. Unlike DC, it has a tall skyline, with more CBD concentration: in the OnTheMap tool, the highest job density category in DC is about the same as the second highest in SF, since SF has a more concentrated CBD. Both Embarcadero and Montgomery Street have more ridership than DC’s busiest station, Union Station. BART just has a steeper dropoff in ridership below the top 3 stations, and fewer stations because of its absurdly long interstations. It doesn’t serve other destinations well, with the partial exception of Oakland and Berkeley, so it doesn’t get the secondary CBD ridership that DC does; it hasn’t produced significant TOD, so it doesn’t get the Arlington ridership; and it serves fewer neighborhoods, so the sort of riders who ride Metro in DC are relegated to the Geary buses.

    LA is of course an entirely different category. Its construction costs are more or less under control, unlike those of DC and SF, so it’s capable of building a subway on the most important bus corridor. The problem is that its core is just too spread out, so it needs very long extensions to get significant ridership. It produces a 20/80 situation – 80% of the cost gives 20% of the benefits.

    datacruncher Reply:

    I searched for the actual plan at the KernCOG and found
    http://www.kerncog.org/regional-transportation-plan

    Skimming several chapters I do see references to rail (such as light rail) but references discuss it in the 2021-2040 window.

    Alan Kandel Reply:

    I read the Draft Executive Summary of the Draft Regional Transportation Plan for Kern County dated Mar. 12, 2014 (http://www.kerncog.org/images/docs/rtp/2014/draft_executive_summary.pdf). In it is mentioned the Sustainable Community Strategy (SCS) and related county-wide greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions-reduction targets of 5% per capita for year 2020 and 10% per capita for year 2035 compared to 2005 levels, the targets consistent with those of the remaining 7 San Joaquin Valley counties.

    Meanwhile, ClimatePlan Policy Coordinator Chanell Fletcher in the blogpost “SCS Implementation – Keeping Local Governments Honest” (http://www.climateplan.org/scs-implementation-keeping-local-governments-honest) writes: “Unfortunately, making plans to achieve California’s sustainability goals is not the same as actually doing it. For California’s vision of sustainability to become a reality, each level of government – city, county, region, and state – must play its part and honor its agreements. … We are, unfortunately, beginning to see local self-interest and inertia trump regional agreements and statewide priorities in Sacramento and Southern California.”

    In this regard, it seems a necessary part of Plan implementation in terms of meeting specified GHG emissions-reduction targets to monitor and review progress (work) and, if need be, enforce established Plan provisions and recommend appropriate changes.

    No one said coming up with then implementing a viable RTP was going to be easy. But why an RTP at all if not followed through on accordingly?

    I believe urban rail – and high-speed rail by extension – are among solutions to help meet RTP/SCS goals, especially in the Valley.

  7. Jos Callinet
    May 20th, 2014 at 20:19
    #7

    EVERYONE HERE WHO HASN’T READ THIS DECEMBER, 2013, ARTICLE ON HSR IN THE ‘HARVARD POLITICAL REVIEW’ – I encourage you to do so. (BTW, the author of the website “Trains for America,” who posted this article, offers this disclaimer ahead of time – very interesting: “A Better Way To Travel: Why Isn’t the U.S. Investing In High-Speed Trains? – Harvard Political Review

    Usual disclaimers apply. The USA will never construct a single mile of European-style high speed rail. This is a well considered and intelligent article. It’s still just pissin’ in the wind, but follow the link anyway.

    A Better Way To Travel: Why Isn’t the U.S. Investing In High-Speed Trains? – Harvard Political Review – here’s the link: http://harvardpolitics.com/united-states/better-way-travel-isnt-u-s-investing-high-speed-trains/

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    We built a few back in the 90s and we are building a few more now.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    The article offered nothing new on the subject. It was so thin, you would think it was a blog post by Matt Yglesias…

    EJ Reply:

    Class of ’17 – c’mon, it’s pretty good for a college freshman.

    Ted Judah Reply:

    It was well written, but it doesn’t really make a point.

    Compared to this guy: http://archive.dailycal.org/article.php?id=2669 it can’t hold a candle…

  8. Jos Callinet
    May 20th, 2014 at 20:25
    #8

    I must add that NO ONE has commented on this article in the HARVARD POLITICAL REVIEW since it was published. This suggests to me two things: 1) Either no one reads the HPR, or, 2) No one gives a rusty shit about high speed rail.

    Michael Reply:

    Read (red) it. They can’t get past the horrible cycling gif of street capacity at the top of the article. Why not a pleasant photo of a high speed train? Article was off to a good start, but ended too soon. Thanks for the link.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    From the looks of it no one comments on anything. The horrible GIF was inspired by a film General Motors produced to promote buses.

  9. joe
    May 21st, 2014 at 07:27
    #9

    So much for all that Monterey Shale Oil
    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-oil-20140521-story.html#navtype=outfit
    Officials slash the estimated amount of recoverable oil buried in the vast Monterey Shale deposit by 96%, deflating projections for 2.8 million new jobs in the state.

    Kern County in particular has seen a flurry of oil activity since 2011, with most of the test wells drilled by independent exploratory companies. Major oil companies have expressed doubts for years about recovering much of the oil.

    Zorro Reply:

    A bunch of dry holes, except for pockets here and there that can be fracked, the San Andreas has gobbled most of the oil, too bad.

  10. Useless
    May 21st, 2014 at 09:03
    #10

    A breakthrough in ultra high speed rail technology. First wireless power transfer system unveiled on what will become the world’s fastest revenue service bullet train, the HEMU-430X(370 km/hr revenue service speed).

    http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/Article.aspx?aid=2989533

    Alon Levy Reply:

    Breakthrough! Except that this technology has been in operation for ten years now. (No, not at high speed. The Korean experiment wasn’t at high speed, either.)

    Richard Mlynarik Reply:

    Alon, you didn’t receive the memo: Koreans breakthrough wonder workers. Chinese evil counterfeiters.
    Hope that clears everything up.

    Eric Reply:

    Richard: you didn’t receive the memo: Don’t be a douchebag.

    Richard Mlynarik Reply:

    Don’t fret, dear Eric, “Useless” will supply the memo. Over and over and over again.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    Meh, it’s been around since the teenaged Tesla read about. It’s a very long transformer coil. A very expensive way to do what a pantograph can do. Its a solution in search of a problem.

    EJ Reply:

    Not quite the same – ground level power uses contact skates, this uses a magnetic field. Sounds sort of like a linear induction motor.

    adirondacker12800 Reply:

    It’s a cross between a transformer with the primary coil unrolled and a linear induction motor which is regular electric motor with the stator unrolled. It’s a really expensive way to do what a pantograph or a third rail shoe can do. To power it up it’s going to need as much conductor to power up the third rail or the catenary. With lots and lots of expensive coil sitting on top of it. And lots of expensive insulation wrapped around the whole mess. It’s never gonna be cheaper than using a lot less coil inside the vehicle and just using a catenary or third rail to feed power to the vehicle. It’s a solution in search of a problem.

    EJ Reply:

    Yeah bitch, magnets! (sorry, couldn’t resist). So they’re just using the magnetic field to generate current to power conventional electric motors? If that’s the case I have a hard time understanding what the point of this is.

    wdobner Reply:

    It’s not even that. It’s just a wireless power transfer system. The same thing as Bombardier’s Primove system. No motive power is derived from the transfer of power across the air gap. They could use a LIM to provide motive power, but the wireless power transfer system might interfere with that. Instead the HEMU-430 uses conventional traction motors. And 1.2MW is slightly more power than is required by the hotel power for a train, so we’re not exactly talking high speed operation using this wireless power transfer system. They claim they’ll need 9MW to make high speed operation on the system a reality, but say nothing of transmission distances. So far wireless power transfer has been at high frequency and relatively low voltage, which means it’s more akin to DC third rail than the 25kv overhead used by high speed trains.

    I did get a kick out of the supposed savings attributable to eliminating catenary, as though the wireless system would be maintenance free.

    Alon Levy Reply:

    We’re obviously dealing in hypotheticals, but eliminating catenary is a big deal at high speed, since the pantograph is the least aerodynamic part of the train. It reduces noise and energy consumption.

  11. Keith Saggers
    May 21st, 2014 at 11:57
    #11

    http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/freight/single-view/view/direct-service-from-chicago-to-mexico.html
    closer than China

    EJ Reply:

    Interesting that BNSF is partnering with Ferromex, which is 25% owned by UP.

  12. JB in PA
    May 21st, 2014 at 14:47
    #12

    Off Topic:
    Mind the gap.

    Reuters
    French rail company orders 2,000 trains too wide for platforms
    PARIS Tue May 20, 2014 4:57pm EDT
    “(Reuters) – France’s national rail company SNCF said on Tuesday it had ordered 2,000 trains for an expanded regional network that are too wide for many station platforms, entailing costly repairs.”

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/20/us-france-trains-idUSKBN0E021720140520

    EJ Reply:

    Or, in this case, the lack of a gap.

    Donk Reply:

    France’s finest transportation professionals?

    Eric Reply:

    I have to say, reading http://schwandl.blogspot.co.il/ , I’m surprised how (reasonable sounding) criticisms he makes about transit systems that are generally considered among the best in the world, such as Copenhagen and Vancouver. I’m not sure where exactly the problem is located, but somehow the field must be harder than it seems at first glance. (Which means the people involved may be of moderate intelligence rather than absolute imbeciles. But either way they shouldn’t be in charge of billions of dollars of our money.)

    Eric Reply:

    how MANY (reasonable sounding)

    Alon Levy Reply:

    So, about Vancouver… the buses do in fact tell you what the terminus is. At my home bus stop, it’s very clear which buses go to UBC and which don’t, and the buses themselves say whether they’re local or express. The annoying part is that the bus stops don’t have full bus schedules – some have no schedules posted on them, others have schedules posted for only some routes but not others. In addition, for a reason I don’t understand, the 44 and 84, which merge at Burrard Street to go to UBC, have separate westbound stops, placed just before the merge point, instead of just after. But overall, using the buses in Vancouver isn’t a big problem, and I had no trouble with it once I moved in, even though the only bus line I’d known much about before moving was the 99.

    The Canada Line is slow because the timetable assumes there are another three stations, which haven’t opened and most likely never will. The PPP contract says the one-way travel time from Waterfront to either the airport or Richmond should be 25 minutes, based on the assumption of three extra stations, so the trains do it in 25 minutes even though they could do it in 22.

    In general, I see a lot more criticism of the Canada Line than it deserves. The ridership is healthy, somewhat above projections, as it should be (projections should be conservative, but not so much there are capacity crunches). The train length is indeed comically low, but there is no capacity crunch; the system was designed around a certain capacity figure, which is far from being exceeded yet. The single-track termini are a bigger problem for capacity than the train length. Despite what Robert says, the cost of building longer stations would’ve been significant, especially downtown, where the construction was done with twin bores, and the stations are deep-level. I don’t know how good the decision to build shorter stations was, but it wasn’t stupid. In PPP terms, it was about US$13,000 per current weekday rider, which is a decent enough deal.

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